Andrew Carnegie & Bill Gates
A Comparitive

Andrew Carnegie & Bill Gates A Comparitive A Comparitive Study of Empire Builders" Andrew Carnegie, a Scottish immigrant, and Bill Gates, a native of the American Northwest, have strongly influenced American commerce of the last two centuries. Carnegie can be slotted into the nineteenth century formula of the self-made man while Gates reflects the milieu of a well-to-do Yankee whose ingenuity allows him to further advance his already well established financial status. In Carnegie's shrewd dealings in the burgeoning nineteenth century American transportation and steel industries and in Gates' personal investment of his time and money into the early growth of the computer industry within its twentieth century US market,…
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Analysis of Ford Motor Company

Analysis of Ford Motor Company Business History: Ford Motor Company began business in 1903. With an initial investment of $28,000, Henry Ford began to create what today is one of the world's largest corporations. Perhaps Ford Motor Company's single greatest contribution to automotive manufacturing was the moving assembly line. This technique greatly increased efficiency through specialization by allowing individual workers to stay in one place and perform the same task repeatedly on multiple vehicles that passed by them. Business Description: Ford owns a group of automotive brands including Ford, Lincoln, Mercury, Mazda, Jaguar, Land Rover, Aston Martin, and Volvo. Ford is a global company with two core businesses: the automotive…
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Airlines and Hub-and-Spoke

Airlines and Hub-and-Spoke The most important developments in the American airline industry over the past generation have not come about through technological advances - although certainly there have been some important technical break-throughs such as more efficient wing de-icers that make flying in cold weather much safer than it once was - but through advances in the ways in which airline companies are organized. This paper examines the effects of some of those changes in what we might call the social structure of airlines, including the rise of the importance of a hub-and-spoke system throughout the industry, the effects of mergers between airline companies, and the consequences of code sharing…
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Advertising Campaign

Advertising Campaign This research examines ethics issue fronts presented by the January 2000 United Colors of Benetton's advertising campaign, titled "We, on Death Row." The advertising took the form of a Benetton's sales catalogue, billboards, and posters, and featured photographs of death-row inmates at various state prisons and an accompanying essay describing their plight. The campaign, like previous Benetton's ad campaigns, fused social-issue advocacy and sales promotion and incited public controversy. Its subject matter gave it a higher public profile, however. Sears, Roebuck & Co., a longtime retail customer of Benetton's, cancelled orders in protest (White, 2000, p. 62), and the state of Missouri sued Benetton's for misrepresenting its marketing…
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Administrative Theory

Administrative Theory Every entrepreneur and executive faces administrative problems on a daily basis, but some problems are of a more profound nature and require close analysis, the development of alternatives, and a decision as to what to change and how to effect that change. One source of problems is a changed business environment, and since the business environment is always in a state of evolving change, it is important for administrators to monitor such changes and to be prepared to cope with them as they occur. Much of administration theory is dedicated to analyzing the process of change and to showing how to respond to change within the organization. Theorists…
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Macroeconomic Theory Applied to Dairy Farms

Macroeconomic Theory Applied to Dairy Farms MACROECONOMICS: SUPPLY, DEMAND, PRICING, AND ELASTICITY OF DEMAND ยท AN ARTICLE ANALYSIS Using Macroeconomics to Explain Entry, Exit, and Farm Size in the Dairy Industry in the United States Foltz (2004) applied macroeconomic theory and models to explain farm exits and changes in herd-size among Connecticut dairy farms. Foltz (2004) found that a relatively stable, inelastic demand caused many farmers to exit the industry when excess demand depressed prices. The demand for dairy products remained relatively stable regardless of price; however, excess supply led many farmers to reduce prices in efforts to move their products. Thinning the number of suppliers brought supply in line…
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Impact of NAFTA on Jobs in the U.S.
The Impact of NAFTA on Jobs in the United States

Impact of NAFTA on Jobs in the U.S. The Impact of NAFTA on Jobs in the United States This paper will discuss the possible impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement upon employment in the United States. The paper will examine the effect of NAFTA on the number of jobs in the U.S., particularly looking at the charges that it will result in a transfer of jobs from the U.S. to Mexico. According to most independent studies, NAFTA will not result in a large exodus of jobs from the U.S., but will probably result in an increase. The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) is designed to create an…
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Blue Collar Workers

Blue Collar Workers Introduction: According to an article by Lawrence Peikes writing in HR Magazine (2004), both employees and employers must understand their respective responsibilities and rights in the workplace. An area in which the law is evolving involves an employer's right to fire an employee at-will. Many companies follow the employment-at-will doctrine, which means an employer, at least in theory, has the right to fire an employee at any time and for any reason, with or without advanced notification and with or without any form of severance pay. Both State and federal laws define instances in which an employee's firing is wrongful and actionable. For example, an employer cannot…
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Asset-Pricing Bubbles

Asset-Pricing Bubbles Over the several hundred during which organized asset trading has occurred, there have been several spectacular pricing bubbles (rapidly increasing asset prices that surpass supportable values for the underlying assets). Following these asset bubbles, there have been dramatic market reversals (rapidly plunging asset prices to levels well below supportable values for the underlying assets). Lastly in the cycle, there have been eventual recoveries, wherein asset prices roughly equate to supportable values for the underlying assets (Brunnermeier, 2001). Supporters of the efficient markets hypothesis contend that such long-term volatility and major market reversals cannot occur. Their explanations for these events follow the line that, for reasons not known, all…
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Business Dynamics of the Progressive Era

Business Dynamics of the Progressive Era In his book Drift & Mastery, Walter Lippmann suggests certain business dynamics in the America of the Progressive era, and he writes his book form the position of a journalist, beginning with the then-current attitude of belief accorded those who made accusations against business, government, and other controlling interests in American life. He finds this situation somewhat incredible, and indeed what he says has resonance for our own age, given the dedication of many to conspiracy theories and to the belief that the "powers that be" are operating in their own interests and manipulating the rest of us to our detriment. Lippmann finds that…
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