A Documentary Book “Into Thin Air” by Jon Krakauer

“Into Thin Air” is about Jon Krakauer, who was originally hired to write an article about climbing Mount Everest for Outside Magazine, but then decided to experience the expedition himself due to dreaming about it since he was a kid. In the beginning, Krakauer states the dangers of Mount. Everest, especially the Khumbu Icefall. After the Khumbu Icefall’s first victim, Jake Breitenbach died on the icefall, eighteen other climbers died also.

The author’s purpose of stating on how many died on Khumbu icefall was to alarm the dangers, as well as to express his challenging adventure and his experience. As well as, Krakauer stated that at one point in time, people were paid so much money to climb the mountain, but many of those climbers never returned. One may confuse the author’s purpose of this article to persuade people to climb the mountain. One would personally think that the money was his final decision to climb the mountain, and in the end, it was accomplished.

Krakauer and his team were led by Kiwi Rob Hall. Krakauer explained how his team, as well as himself, suffered through this journey. Krakauer and his team lost major weight, their stamina was lowered, as well as their energy. Additionally, after Krakauer witnessed the 1996 Everest spring disaster in which twelve climbers eventually perished, Krakauer felt responsible to recall the tragedy as it was unfolded. After spending over a month living in close quarters atop of the world, Krakauer grew attached to Hall, one of his teammates, as well as other climbers from different expeditions, particularly those of Scott Fischer’s Mountain Madness team.

When disaster struck in early May, leaving nine of Krakauer’s friends and adventurers dead, Krakauer was devastated and also responsible for the lives of those lost. Krakauer’s hid his guilt and months later, he realized that he had inaccurately reported the death of guide Andy Harris. Confused and scarred by the experience, he decided to document the calamity in “Into Thin Air”, a book based on information from his experience and journalistic research, with the goal of imparting the lessons that he believes need to be learned in the tragedy’s aftermath. To go along with, in the beginning of “Into Thin Air, ”

Krakauer provides lots of facts about Mount. Everest and climbers who first climbed mountains. He did this by providing mountain climbing and Everest experience more understandable to his readers/audience. Krakauer also provides an excess amount of background information. The background information included explanations of the history of Everest and its early climber, climbing techniques, as well as logistical information regarding the climbers on his team and those from other expeditions. Krakauer relies heavily on imagery in order to accurately depict the Himalayas in print.

However, Krakauer’s main strategy takes shape in his scheme that he uses to climax the drama that took place on the upper reaches of the mountain. As he chronicles his journey from India all the way to his return to base camp after summiting, Krakauer’s tone and diction reflect his evolving sentiments throughout his journey. For example, the tone of the early chapters is one of excitement and nervousness, which quickly turns into fades into exhaustion and discomfort as he realizes the huge task before him.

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