Overpopulation and World Hunger

Overpopulation and World Hunger Overpopulation and world hunger have been discussed as interrelating factors since the 1950s, when concern about the exploding "baby boom," particularly in developing countries, was considered in light of the growing international trade market following World War II. The purpose of this paper will be to analyze this relationship today, the truths and myths surrounding it and how elements such as food supply, technology, birth rates and birth control figure into the equation. The world's population in 1950 was about 2.5 billion; some time in the late 1980s it passed five billion (Keyfitz, 1989, p. 119). This increase in the last forty years equals the total…
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Evolution of Paper Money & Commercial Banking in U.S.

Evolution of Paper Money & Commercial Banking in U.S. THE EVOLUTION OF PAPER MONEY AND COMMERCIAL BANKING IN THE UNITED STATES THROUGH 1865 The introduction of paper money in England accompanies the transition of the economy from feudalism to capitalism. The move away from the manorial production system was brought about in part because of a recognition that some goods could be bought from town sources more cheaply and in better quality than similar goods could be produced on the manors. This recognition led to a desire to produce more efficiently on the manor, so that something of exchange value would be available to acquire these outside goods. Eventually, this…
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History of Financial Panics & Crises in the U.S.

History of Financial Panics & Crises in the U.S. This research examines financial panics, depressions, and crises that have occurred in the United States from the time the nation was founded through 1987. Particular attention is given to those crises occurring or beginning in or near the years of 1837, 1857, 1873, 1893, 1907, 1929, and 1987. A liberal definition what constitutes a financial panic, depression, or crisis is observed in this research, because some of these crises affect professional investors to a much greater extent that the general economy is affected, while other crises were manifestations much broader sets of problems, the combined impact of which was detrimental to…
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Illegal Immigration

Illegal Immigration The purpose of this document is to provide an analysis of the economic impact on the U.S. economy from illegal immigration. From displacing low-skilled, low-wage blue collar workers to taxing already overburdened state social services, illegal immigrants have a deleterious impact on the U.S. economy. This analysis proposes that the U.S. fails to give enough weight to the economic potential of immigrants in setting immigration policy. According to estimates from the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), more than 5 million illegal aliens currently reside in the U.S. with 400,000 more added to their numbers annually (Camarota 1). A majority of these illegal aliens reside in border states like…
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The financial turmoil in East Asia

The financial turmoil in East Asia The financial turmoil in East Asia has affected markets in different parts of the world and has had a particularly devastating effect on the countries of East Asia itself. Since the beginning of this year, the stock markets of Asia have collectively lost $400 billion in value, and the losses in Hong Kong in mid-October created concern around the world and affected other stock markets, including that in the U.S., which lost a large percentage of its value in one day. The effect on Europe has been more as a threat on the one hand and an opportunity on the other. While the monetary…
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Technology Funding for Libraries

Technology Funding for Libraries Libraries, Funding, and Technology While a small business with 2 to 19 employees can expect to spend slightly under $1,500 to develop a Web site (Interland launches uniquea, 2003), the technology funding needs of libraries in general and university academic libraries in particular is set at a far higher level. Some 10 years ago Pastine and Kacena (1994) reported that for the medium and larger sized academic libraries it is not uncommon for computer costs associated only with implementing online catalogs, circulation/reserve, acquisitions/accounting, and serials control systems to require an initial investment of $5 million or more. Annual maintenance, licensing agreements, software and hardware requirements at…
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JONES NEW YORK: FINANCIAL EVALUATION

JONES NEW YORK: FINANCIAL EVALUATION JONES NEW YORK: FINANCIAL EVALUATION Jones New York is the marketing name of the Jones Apparel Group, which has its corporate headquarters in Bristol, Pennsylvania (HooverÆs Online û 2147 4). All financial reports for the company are prepared under the Jones Apparel Group name, as opposed to the Jones New York name. This research develops a financial evaluation of Jones Apparel Group. Initially, however, the report presents a brief history of the company. Jones Apparel Group originally was a subsidiary of the W. R. Grace Company. In 1975, two senior officers in the Jones Apparel Division bought the subsidiary from W. R. Grace Company and…
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France: Economics

France: Economics France is described by the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) (2009) as having a population of 64,057,762 citizens. Its main imports consist of machinery and equipment, vehicles, crude oil, aircraft, plastics, and chemicals. The CIA (2009) states that France imports approximately $833 billion annually from partners such as Germany, Belgium, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, the United States, and China. Annually, France exports $761 billion. Its main export partners are Germany, Spain, Italy, the United Kingdom, Belgium, the United States, and the Netherlands. Main exports include machinery and transportation equipment, aircraft, plastics, chemicals, pharmaceutical products, iron and steel, and beverages (CIA, 2009). The political philosophy of France…
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Sports Law – Collective Bargaining

Sports Law - Collective Bargaining Question 1. Major League Baseball (MLB) shares with the National Hockey League (NHL) the lack of a salary cap which introduces a wide disparity in the financial value of teams ("CBA: The MLB Model" 1). This lack of a salary cap has created an outdated economic structure which has reached what some analysts call "an unacceptable level of revenue disparity and completive imbalance" which creates a growing gap between the "haves" and the "have nots" clubs ("CBA: The MLB Model" 1). The MLB Players' Association has resisted a salary cap for years and it was this issue that prompted the 1994 players' strike that wiped…
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Marshall’s Labor and Wage Theory

Marshall's Labor and Wage Theory The purpose of this research is to examine Alfred Marshall's labor and wage theory. Marshall's theory is then contrasted with those of later economists. Alfred Marshall was an Englishman, who lived from 1842 to 1924). During his somewhat more than 50 years as a university lecturer, professor, and researcher, Marshall produced 82 publications. Three of his most important published contributions to economics--The Economics of Industry (first published in 1879), Principles of Economics (first published in 1890), and Industry and Trade (first published in 1919)--have experienced multiple editions and printings. His fourth great published work on economics--Money, Credit and Commerce--was issued in 1923--one year before his…
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