Glee MAG

Can we have a round of applause for a realistic show about high school? Thank you.

“Glee,” a new series on FOX, is about students trying to find their niche. And they do – in the Glee Club. Their principal is looking for any excuse to cancel the club (since the last director was fond of flirting with members). Enter Will, the (cute) Spanish teacher and a former Glee Club member himself, who takes over to help the club regain its former glory. But there&#39s a tough road ahead.

With a talented cast – featuring Lea Michele from “Spring Awakening” and Matthew Morrison from “Hairspray” – “Glee” is the most realistic portrayal of high school students on television.

I am gleeful to see this show break stereotypes and inject honesty into its writing. Unlike with Blair Waldorf or Naomi Clark, I can relate to these characters (they don&#39t walk around dropping brand names). They are searching for who they are because they don&#39t fall into trite social categories like jocks, cheerleaders, etc. And what a relief to find a student in a wheelchair (Arty) outside of a Hallmark made-for-TV movie. I feel warmth after watching “Glee,” compared with my desperate urge to buy hairbands after watching “Gossip Girl.”

I&#39m not a fan of “High School Musical,” yet I enjoy the singing and dancing in “Glee.” Unlike “HSM,” which was directed at preteens, these characters have depth. Rachel is a talented girl who wants to be accepted by her peers and to be special, and Finn is a jock who plays football and endures his teammates&#39 teasing because he enjoys singing. “High School Musical” – cheesiness + real life – unrealistic plans to save the day = “Glee.”

Sure, “Glee” contains some clichés – Rachel is going to fall for Finn – but in spite of this, I think the show will inspire teenagers, and even teachers who have lost the love for what they do. Why? It&#39s honest. It is not extravagant or pure fairy tale.

It&#39s real.

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