Percy Bysshe Shelley: Poetry and the Individual

Working at the height of the Romantic Era, Percy Bysshe Shelley set the standard for literature of the period. Consistently using the conventional comparisons between humans and nature, Shelley in his poetry emphasizes man’s ability to remove himself from the commonplace and initiate change, and to produce new ideas through the power of imagination and creativity. Similarly in A Defense of Poetry, Shelley attempts to establish poetry’s place in a rapidly changing, industrialized world. He wrote his defense in response to Thomas Love Peacock’s The Four Ages of Poetry, which urged great minds to stop wasting their time with humanities, especially poetry, and put their intellectual efforts toward the newly…
Read More

Controversial Genius of Donne’s Poetry

Donne is sick and his poetry is sick. – Stanley Fish Fish’s comment, though extreme in its reductive appraisal, is nevertheless understandable. He may find Donne’s poetry objectionable on three accounts: style, explicitness, and morbidity. With regards to style, Fish says Donne “is bulimic…someone who gorges himself to a point beyond satiety, and then sticks his finger down his throat and throws up.” And Fish is certainly not alone in this sentiment. C.S. Lewis called Donne the “saddest” and most “uncomfortable” of our poets, whose verse “exercises the same dreadful fascination that we feel in the grip of the worst kind of bore – the hot-eyed, inescapable kind.” For his…
Read More

An Interpretation of Horace’s Art of Poetry Essay

He criticized the Romans for being indulgent and mercenary. Since everybody was so captive in gaining money. he asked. “what poems can we anticipate to compose deserving surfacing with protective oils and hive awaying in all right wood? ” ( 129 ) . To Horace. money was non the primary motive to prosecute his composing calling. and that explained why Horace rejected Augustus’s offer to go his secretary. which was an honest place for a freed adult male. With his great virtuousnesss and ethical motives. Horace was doubtless one of the best poets in the Roman Empire. Horace’s Hagiographas revealed the dominant Hellenic influence. They were facile and extremely rational.…
Read More

Jessie Pope Poetry

The tone carries on insistently and repetitively putting stress on the question, and on the last word of each line – ‘hand? ‘, ‘stand? ‘, ‘gun? ‘, ‘run? ‘. The insistence seems impossible to resist, like a constant drum beat inside the soldiers minds making the soldiers feel like they have no alternative but to go to war. ‘Dulce et Decorum est’ has an accusatory tone; this tone is directed mockingly at “my friend”, particularly in the last stanza. The poet’s anger builds and the use of the direct and accusatory tone excels. The poet gives his description impact by speaking in the present tense – ‘guttering, choking, drowning’, this…
Read More

The Conflict of the Frustration of Poets in Introduction to Poetry, a Poem by Billy Collins

Billy Collin’s poem, Introduction to Poetry, dramatizes conflict of poets’ frustration when their work is overanalyzed instead of being enjoyed. More specifically, this poem’s narrator stresses the author’s intent of providing open-ended messages when writing poetry while audiences fail to appreciate poetry properly, instead seeing them as intellectual burdens. This struggle is shown by the shocking personifications and imagery in the final two stanzas of “[tying] the poem to a chair with rope/and [torturing] a confession out of it… and [torturing] a confession out of it.” These highly charged descriptions show how disappointed poets become when they realize that their poetry stresses student readers in understanding the poems rather than…
Read More

Why Do People Need to Confess: The Analysis of Poe’s Poetry

In his essay, “The Philosophy of Composition,” Edgar Allan Poe writes that in an ideal poem, “two things are invariably required first, some amount of complexity, or more properly, adaptation; and, secondly, some amount of suggestiveness some under-current, however indefinite, of meaning.” While he claims to use this statement to justify the “suggestiveness” of the final two stanzas of “The Raven,” he points at a more universal under-current that lies behind several of his poems, particularly those about deceased women. In poems such as “Annabel Lee” and “The Raven,” the speaker covertly confesses to murdering the women about whom they are written. The complexity of these poems lies in the…
Read More

Escapism in the Poetry of Freneau, Bryant, and Poe

The theme of escape has long been regarded as a powerful and timeless one in various works of literature, and in poetry more specifically. Escapism is a dominant and prevailing topic in poetry as it reveals an alternative existence to living a life of struggle, hardship, and sadness. Escapism can be sought through dreams where the reality of day to day life can temporarily be evaded, through nature where peace and solace can be found, or even through belief in religion where trusting in faith can help one surpass current challenges. Poets Philip Freneau, William Cullen Bryant, and Edgar Allan Poe all seem to address the enduring theme of escape…
Read More

The Human Experience in Bruce Dawe’s Poetry

A poet who energetically contemplated the world around him, Dawe wasn’t just a devoted Australian wordsmith with a dream that his work would one day be analysed. He was a book full of ideas, complex ideas, often about the essence of life and beyond. Through his poems Bedroom Conversations, Up The Wall, and Enter Without So Much As Knocking, Dawe presents his intricate view of the human experience in an interesting light, one that illuminates both the paradoxes and the cynicism of our world. Bruce Dawe explores the human experience as a paradoxical cycle that is heavily dependent on the cynical nature of society. Although this nature brings society together…
Read More

What Is Performance Poetry All About: A Detailed Analysis of The Blue Roofs of Japan

“To listen is to simultaneously attend to what is present and what is absent”. In “Understanding the Sound of Not Understanding,” Jed Rasula analyses the impact of the spoken word on the understanding of poetry. Historically, poetry, and most literary forms, started as an oral tradition. They were sung by barbs in various cultures. The very notion of poetry, originating from the the ancient Greek poiesis meaning “to create”, has always implied a way of structuring sound to create meaning. However, the actual sound in poetry is undeniably the most overlooked aspect of the art form. The convention has long been to study what the poem “says” and not take…
Read More

The Poetry of Sylvia Plath

That said, the poem gains its most sinister and perhaps most powerful energies from deeply autobiographical confession. That “Daddy” was written by Plath as an exercise in personal catharsis, as well as a lyric poem meant to excite large audiences, is obvious. The lines which seemingly abruptly refer to San Francisco: “Ghastly statue with one gray toe / Big as a Frisco Seal / And a head in the freakish Atlantic. ” identify the daddy in the poem “as a colossus who stretches across America from the Atlantic to the Pacific–a colossus even larger than the one described in “The Colossus. ” These seemingly obscure details are in fact references…
Read More

Percy Bysshe Shelley: Poetry and the Individual

Working at the height of the Romantic Era, Percy Bysshe Shelley set the standard for literature of the period. Consistently using the conventional comparisons between humans and nature, Shelley in his poetry emphasizes man’s ability to remove himself from the commonplace and initiate change, and to produce new ideas through the power of imagination and creativity. Similarly in A Defense of Poetry, Shelley attempts to establish poetry’s place in a rapidly changing, industrialized world. He wrote his defense in response to Thomas Love Peacock’s The Four Ages of Poetry, which urged great minds to stop wasting their time with humanities, especially poetry, and put their intellectual efforts toward the newly…
Read More

Controversial Genius of Donne’s Poetry

Donne is sick and his poetry is sick. – Stanley Fish Fish’s comment, though extreme in its reductive appraisal, is nevertheless understandable. He may find Donne’s poetry objectionable on three accounts: style, explicitness, and morbidity. With regards to style, Fish says Donne “is bulimic…someone who gorges himself to a point beyond satiety, and then sticks his finger down his throat and throws up.” And Fish is certainly not alone in this sentiment. C.S. Lewis called Donne the “saddest” and most “uncomfortable” of our poets, whose verse “exercises the same dreadful fascination that we feel in the grip of the worst kind of bore – the hot-eyed, inescapable kind.” For his…
Read More

An Interpretation of Horace’s Art of Poetry Essay

He criticized the Romans for being indulgent and mercenary. Since everybody was so captive in gaining money. he asked. “what poems can we anticipate to compose deserving surfacing with protective oils and hive awaying in all right wood? ” ( 129 ) . To Horace. money was non the primary motive to prosecute his composing calling. and that explained why Horace rejected Augustus’s offer to go his secretary. which was an honest place for a freed adult male. With his great virtuousnesss and ethical motives. Horace was doubtless one of the best poets in the Roman Empire. Horace’s Hagiographas revealed the dominant Hellenic influence. They were facile and extremely rational.…
Read More

Jessie Pope Poetry

The tone carries on insistently and repetitively putting stress on the question, and on the last word of each line – ‘hand? ‘, ‘stand? ‘, ‘gun? ‘, ‘run? ‘. The insistence seems impossible to resist, like a constant drum beat inside the soldiers minds making the soldiers feel like they have no alternative but to go to war. ‘Dulce et Decorum est’ has an accusatory tone; this tone is directed mockingly at “my friend”, particularly in the last stanza. The poet’s anger builds and the use of the direct and accusatory tone excels. The poet gives his description impact by speaking in the present tense – ‘guttering, choking, drowning’, this…
Read More

The Conflict of the Frustration of Poets in Introduction to Poetry, a Poem by Billy Collins

Billy Collin’s poem, Introduction to Poetry, dramatizes conflict of poets’ frustration when their work is overanalyzed instead of being enjoyed. More specifically, this poem’s narrator stresses the author’s intent of providing open-ended messages when writing poetry while audiences fail to appreciate poetry properly, instead seeing them as intellectual burdens. This struggle is shown by the shocking personifications and imagery in the final two stanzas of “[tying] the poem to a chair with rope/and [torturing] a confession out of it… and [torturing] a confession out of it.” These highly charged descriptions show how disappointed poets become when they realize that their poetry stresses student readers in understanding the poems rather than…
Read More

Why Do People Need to Confess: The Analysis of Poe’s Poetry

In his essay, “The Philosophy of Composition,” Edgar Allan Poe writes that in an ideal poem, “two things are invariably required first, some amount of complexity, or more properly, adaptation; and, secondly, some amount of suggestiveness some under-current, however indefinite, of meaning.” While he claims to use this statement to justify the “suggestiveness” of the final two stanzas of “The Raven,” he points at a more universal under-current that lies behind several of his poems, particularly those about deceased women. In poems such as “Annabel Lee” and “The Raven,” the speaker covertly confesses to murdering the women about whom they are written. The complexity of these poems lies in the…
Read More

Escapism in the Poetry of Freneau, Bryant, and Poe

The theme of escape has long been regarded as a powerful and timeless one in various works of literature, and in poetry more specifically. Escapism is a dominant and prevailing topic in poetry as it reveals an alternative existence to living a life of struggle, hardship, and sadness. Escapism can be sought through dreams where the reality of day to day life can temporarily be evaded, through nature where peace and solace can be found, or even through belief in religion where trusting in faith can help one surpass current challenges. Poets Philip Freneau, William Cullen Bryant, and Edgar Allan Poe all seem to address the enduring theme of escape…
Read More

The Human Experience in Bruce Dawe’s Poetry

A poet who energetically contemplated the world around him, Dawe wasn’t just a devoted Australian wordsmith with a dream that his work would one day be analysed. He was a book full of ideas, complex ideas, often about the essence of life and beyond. Through his poems Bedroom Conversations, Up The Wall, and Enter Without So Much As Knocking, Dawe presents his intricate view of the human experience in an interesting light, one that illuminates both the paradoxes and the cynicism of our world. Bruce Dawe explores the human experience as a paradoxical cycle that is heavily dependent on the cynical nature of society. Although this nature brings society together…
Read More

What Is Performance Poetry All About: A Detailed Analysis of The Blue Roofs of Japan

“To listen is to simultaneously attend to what is present and what is absent”. In “Understanding the Sound of Not Understanding,” Jed Rasula analyses the impact of the spoken word on the understanding of poetry. Historically, poetry, and most literary forms, started as an oral tradition. They were sung by barbs in various cultures. The very notion of poetry, originating from the the ancient Greek poiesis meaning “to create”, has always implied a way of structuring sound to create meaning. However, the actual sound in poetry is undeniably the most overlooked aspect of the art form. The convention has long been to study what the poem “says” and not take…
Read More

The Poetry of Sylvia Plath

That said, the poem gains its most sinister and perhaps most powerful energies from deeply autobiographical confession. That “Daddy” was written by Plath as an exercise in personal catharsis, as well as a lyric poem meant to excite large audiences, is obvious. The lines which seemingly abruptly refer to San Francisco: “Ghastly statue with one gray toe / Big as a Frisco Seal / And a head in the freakish Atlantic. ” identify the daddy in the poem “as a colossus who stretches across America from the Atlantic to the Pacific–a colossus even larger than the one described in “The Colossus. ” These seemingly obscure details are in fact references…
Read More

Percy Bysshe Shelley: Poetry and the Individual

Working at the height of the Romantic Era, Percy Bysshe Shelley set the standard for literature of the period. Consistently using the conventional comparisons between humans and nature, Shelley in his poetry emphasizes man’s ability to remove himself from the commonplace and initiate change, and to produce new ideas through the power of imagination and creativity. Similarly in A Defense of Poetry, Shelley attempts to establish poetry’s place in a rapidly changing, industrialized world. He wrote his defense in response to Thomas Love Peacock’s The Four Ages of Poetry, which urged great minds to stop wasting their time with humanities, especially poetry, and put their intellectual efforts toward the newly…
Read More

Controversial Genius of Donne’s Poetry

Donne is sick and his poetry is sick. – Stanley Fish Fish’s comment, though extreme in its reductive appraisal, is nevertheless understandable. He may find Donne’s poetry objectionable on three accounts: style, explicitness, and morbidity. With regards to style, Fish says Donne “is bulimic…someone who gorges himself to a point beyond satiety, and then sticks his finger down his throat and throws up.” And Fish is certainly not alone in this sentiment. C.S. Lewis called Donne the “saddest” and most “uncomfortable” of our poets, whose verse “exercises the same dreadful fascination that we feel in the grip of the worst kind of bore – the hot-eyed, inescapable kind.” For his…
Read More

An Interpretation of Horace’s Art of Poetry Essay

He criticized the Romans for being indulgent and mercenary. Since everybody was so captive in gaining money. he asked. “what poems can we anticipate to compose deserving surfacing with protective oils and hive awaying in all right wood? ” ( 129 ) . To Horace. money was non the primary motive to prosecute his composing calling. and that explained why Horace rejected Augustus’s offer to go his secretary. which was an honest place for a freed adult male. With his great virtuousnesss and ethical motives. Horace was doubtless one of the best poets in the Roman Empire. Horace’s Hagiographas revealed the dominant Hellenic influence. They were facile and extremely rational.…
Read More

Jessie Pope Poetry

The tone carries on insistently and repetitively putting stress on the question, and on the last word of each line – ‘hand? ‘, ‘stand? ‘, ‘gun? ‘, ‘run? ‘. The insistence seems impossible to resist, like a constant drum beat inside the soldiers minds making the soldiers feel like they have no alternative but to go to war. ‘Dulce et Decorum est’ has an accusatory tone; this tone is directed mockingly at “my friend”, particularly in the last stanza. The poet’s anger builds and the use of the direct and accusatory tone excels. The poet gives his description impact by speaking in the present tense – ‘guttering, choking, drowning’, this…
Read More

The Conflict of the Frustration of Poets in Introduction to Poetry, a Poem by Billy Collins

Billy Collin’s poem, Introduction to Poetry, dramatizes conflict of poets’ frustration when their work is overanalyzed instead of being enjoyed. More specifically, this poem’s narrator stresses the author’s intent of providing open-ended messages when writing poetry while audiences fail to appreciate poetry properly, instead seeing them as intellectual burdens. This struggle is shown by the shocking personifications and imagery in the final two stanzas of “[tying] the poem to a chair with rope/and [torturing] a confession out of it… and [torturing] a confession out of it.” These highly charged descriptions show how disappointed poets become when they realize that their poetry stresses student readers in understanding the poems rather than…
Read More

Why Do People Need to Confess: The Analysis of Poe’s Poetry

In his essay, “The Philosophy of Composition,” Edgar Allan Poe writes that in an ideal poem, “two things are invariably required first, some amount of complexity, or more properly, adaptation; and, secondly, some amount of suggestiveness some under-current, however indefinite, of meaning.” While he claims to use this statement to justify the “suggestiveness” of the final two stanzas of “The Raven,” he points at a more universal under-current that lies behind several of his poems, particularly those about deceased women. In poems such as “Annabel Lee” and “The Raven,” the speaker covertly confesses to murdering the women about whom they are written. The complexity of these poems lies in the…
Read More

Escapism in the Poetry of Freneau, Bryant, and Poe

The theme of escape has long been regarded as a powerful and timeless one in various works of literature, and in poetry more specifically. Escapism is a dominant and prevailing topic in poetry as it reveals an alternative existence to living a life of struggle, hardship, and sadness. Escapism can be sought through dreams where the reality of day to day life can temporarily be evaded, through nature where peace and solace can be found, or even through belief in religion where trusting in faith can help one surpass current challenges. Poets Philip Freneau, William Cullen Bryant, and Edgar Allan Poe all seem to address the enduring theme of escape…
Read More

The Human Experience in Bruce Dawe’s Poetry

A poet who energetically contemplated the world around him, Dawe wasn’t just a devoted Australian wordsmith with a dream that his work would one day be analysed. He was a book full of ideas, complex ideas, often about the essence of life and beyond. Through his poems Bedroom Conversations, Up The Wall, and Enter Without So Much As Knocking, Dawe presents his intricate view of the human experience in an interesting light, one that illuminates both the paradoxes and the cynicism of our world. Bruce Dawe explores the human experience as a paradoxical cycle that is heavily dependent on the cynical nature of society. Although this nature brings society together…
Read More

What Is Performance Poetry All About: A Detailed Analysis of The Blue Roofs of Japan

“To listen is to simultaneously attend to what is present and what is absent”. In “Understanding the Sound of Not Understanding,” Jed Rasula analyses the impact of the spoken word on the understanding of poetry. Historically, poetry, and most literary forms, started as an oral tradition. They were sung by barbs in various cultures. The very notion of poetry, originating from the the ancient Greek poiesis meaning “to create”, has always implied a way of structuring sound to create meaning. However, the actual sound in poetry is undeniably the most overlooked aspect of the art form. The convention has long been to study what the poem “says” and not take…
Read More

The Poetry of Sylvia Plath

That said, the poem gains its most sinister and perhaps most powerful energies from deeply autobiographical confession. That “Daddy” was written by Plath as an exercise in personal catharsis, as well as a lyric poem meant to excite large audiences, is obvious. The lines which seemingly abruptly refer to San Francisco: “Ghastly statue with one gray toe / Big as a Frisco Seal / And a head in the freakish Atlantic. ” identify the daddy in the poem “as a colossus who stretches across America from the Atlantic to the Pacific–a colossus even larger than the one described in “The Colossus. ” These seemingly obscure details are in fact references…
Read More

Percy Bysshe Shelley: Poetry and the Individual

Working at the height of the Romantic Era, Percy Bysshe Shelley set the standard for literature of the period. Consistently using the conventional comparisons between humans and nature, Shelley in his poetry emphasizes man’s ability to remove himself from the commonplace and initiate change, and to produce new ideas through the power of imagination and creativity. Similarly in A Defense of Poetry, Shelley attempts to establish poetry’s place in a rapidly changing, industrialized world. He wrote his defense in response to Thomas Love Peacock’s The Four Ages of Poetry, which urged great minds to stop wasting their time with humanities, especially poetry, and put their intellectual efforts toward the newly…
Read More

Controversial Genius of Donne’s Poetry

Donne is sick and his poetry is sick. – Stanley Fish Fish’s comment, though extreme in its reductive appraisal, is nevertheless understandable. He may find Donne’s poetry objectionable on three accounts: style, explicitness, and morbidity. With regards to style, Fish says Donne “is bulimic…someone who gorges himself to a point beyond satiety, and then sticks his finger down his throat and throws up.” And Fish is certainly not alone in this sentiment. C.S. Lewis called Donne the “saddest” and most “uncomfortable” of our poets, whose verse “exercises the same dreadful fascination that we feel in the grip of the worst kind of bore – the hot-eyed, inescapable kind.” For his…
Read More

An Interpretation of Horace’s Art of Poetry Essay

He criticized the Romans for being indulgent and mercenary. Since everybody was so captive in gaining money. he asked. “what poems can we anticipate to compose deserving surfacing with protective oils and hive awaying in all right wood? ” ( 129 ) . To Horace. money was non the primary motive to prosecute his composing calling. and that explained why Horace rejected Augustus’s offer to go his secretary. which was an honest place for a freed adult male. With his great virtuousnesss and ethical motives. Horace was doubtless one of the best poets in the Roman Empire. Horace’s Hagiographas revealed the dominant Hellenic influence. They were facile and extremely rational.…
Read More

Jessie Pope Poetry

The tone carries on insistently and repetitively putting stress on the question, and on the last word of each line – ‘hand? ‘, ‘stand? ‘, ‘gun? ‘, ‘run? ‘. The insistence seems impossible to resist, like a constant drum beat inside the soldiers minds making the soldiers feel like they have no alternative but to go to war. ‘Dulce et Decorum est’ has an accusatory tone; this tone is directed mockingly at “my friend”, particularly in the last stanza. The poet’s anger builds and the use of the direct and accusatory tone excels. The poet gives his description impact by speaking in the present tense – ‘guttering, choking, drowning’, this…
Read More

The Conflict of the Frustration of Poets in Introduction to Poetry, a Poem by Billy Collins

Billy Collin’s poem, Introduction to Poetry, dramatizes conflict of poets’ frustration when their work is overanalyzed instead of being enjoyed. More specifically, this poem’s narrator stresses the author’s intent of providing open-ended messages when writing poetry while audiences fail to appreciate poetry properly, instead seeing them as intellectual burdens. This struggle is shown by the shocking personifications and imagery in the final two stanzas of “[tying] the poem to a chair with rope/and [torturing] a confession out of it… and [torturing] a confession out of it.” These highly charged descriptions show how disappointed poets become when they realize that their poetry stresses student readers in understanding the poems rather than…
Read More

Why Do People Need to Confess: The Analysis of Poe’s Poetry

In his essay, “The Philosophy of Composition,” Edgar Allan Poe writes that in an ideal poem, “two things are invariably required first, some amount of complexity, or more properly, adaptation; and, secondly, some amount of suggestiveness some under-current, however indefinite, of meaning.” While he claims to use this statement to justify the “suggestiveness” of the final two stanzas of “The Raven,” he points at a more universal under-current that lies behind several of his poems, particularly those about deceased women. In poems such as “Annabel Lee” and “The Raven,” the speaker covertly confesses to murdering the women about whom they are written. The complexity of these poems lies in the…
Read More

Escapism in the Poetry of Freneau, Bryant, and Poe

The theme of escape has long been regarded as a powerful and timeless one in various works of literature, and in poetry more specifically. Escapism is a dominant and prevailing topic in poetry as it reveals an alternative existence to living a life of struggle, hardship, and sadness. Escapism can be sought through dreams where the reality of day to day life can temporarily be evaded, through nature where peace and solace can be found, or even through belief in religion where trusting in faith can help one surpass current challenges. Poets Philip Freneau, William Cullen Bryant, and Edgar Allan Poe all seem to address the enduring theme of escape…
Read More

The Human Experience in Bruce Dawe’s Poetry

A poet who energetically contemplated the world around him, Dawe wasn’t just a devoted Australian wordsmith with a dream that his work would one day be analysed. He was a book full of ideas, complex ideas, often about the essence of life and beyond. Through his poems Bedroom Conversations, Up The Wall, and Enter Without So Much As Knocking, Dawe presents his intricate view of the human experience in an interesting light, one that illuminates both the paradoxes and the cynicism of our world. Bruce Dawe explores the human experience as a paradoxical cycle that is heavily dependent on the cynical nature of society. Although this nature brings society together…
Read More

What Is Performance Poetry All About: A Detailed Analysis of The Blue Roofs of Japan

“To listen is to simultaneously attend to what is present and what is absent”. In “Understanding the Sound of Not Understanding,” Jed Rasula analyses the impact of the spoken word on the understanding of poetry. Historically, poetry, and most literary forms, started as an oral tradition. They were sung by barbs in various cultures. The very notion of poetry, originating from the the ancient Greek poiesis meaning “to create”, has always implied a way of structuring sound to create meaning. However, the actual sound in poetry is undeniably the most overlooked aspect of the art form. The convention has long been to study what the poem “says” and not take…
Read More

The Poetry of Sylvia Plath

That said, the poem gains its most sinister and perhaps most powerful energies from deeply autobiographical confession. That “Daddy” was written by Plath as an exercise in personal catharsis, as well as a lyric poem meant to excite large audiences, is obvious. The lines which seemingly abruptly refer to San Francisco: “Ghastly statue with one gray toe / Big as a Frisco Seal / And a head in the freakish Atlantic. ” identify the daddy in the poem “as a colossus who stretches across America from the Atlantic to the Pacific–a colossus even larger than the one described in “The Colossus. ” These seemingly obscure details are in fact references…
Read More

Percy Bysshe Shelley: Poetry and the Individual

Working at the height of the Romantic Era, Percy Bysshe Shelley set the standard for literature of the period. Consistently using the conventional comparisons between humans and nature, Shelley in his poetry emphasizes man’s ability to remove himself from the commonplace and initiate change, and to produce new ideas through the power of imagination and creativity. Similarly in A Defense of Poetry, Shelley attempts to establish poetry’s place in a rapidly changing, industrialized world. He wrote his defense in response to Thomas Love Peacock’s The Four Ages of Poetry, which urged great minds to stop wasting their time with humanities, especially poetry, and put their intellectual efforts toward the newly…
Read More

Controversial Genius of Donne’s Poetry

Donne is sick and his poetry is sick. – Stanley Fish Fish’s comment, though extreme in its reductive appraisal, is nevertheless understandable. He may find Donne’s poetry objectionable on three accounts: style, explicitness, and morbidity. With regards to style, Fish says Donne “is bulimic…someone who gorges himself to a point beyond satiety, and then sticks his finger down his throat and throws up.” And Fish is certainly not alone in this sentiment. C.S. Lewis called Donne the “saddest” and most “uncomfortable” of our poets, whose verse “exercises the same dreadful fascination that we feel in the grip of the worst kind of bore – the hot-eyed, inescapable kind.” For his…
Read More

An Interpretation of Horace’s Art of Poetry Essay

He criticized the Romans for being indulgent and mercenary. Since everybody was so captive in gaining money. he asked. “what poems can we anticipate to compose deserving surfacing with protective oils and hive awaying in all right wood? ” ( 129 ) . To Horace. money was non the primary motive to prosecute his composing calling. and that explained why Horace rejected Augustus’s offer to go his secretary. which was an honest place for a freed adult male. With his great virtuousnesss and ethical motives. Horace was doubtless one of the best poets in the Roman Empire. Horace’s Hagiographas revealed the dominant Hellenic influence. They were facile and extremely rational.…
Read More

Jessie Pope Poetry

The tone carries on insistently and repetitively putting stress on the question, and on the last word of each line – ‘hand? ‘, ‘stand? ‘, ‘gun? ‘, ‘run? ‘. The insistence seems impossible to resist, like a constant drum beat inside the soldiers minds making the soldiers feel like they have no alternative but to go to war. ‘Dulce et Decorum est’ has an accusatory tone; this tone is directed mockingly at “my friend”, particularly in the last stanza. The poet’s anger builds and the use of the direct and accusatory tone excels. The poet gives his description impact by speaking in the present tense – ‘guttering, choking, drowning’, this…
Read More

The Conflict of the Frustration of Poets in Introduction to Poetry, a Poem by Billy Collins

Billy Collin’s poem, Introduction to Poetry, dramatizes conflict of poets’ frustration when their work is overanalyzed instead of being enjoyed. More specifically, this poem’s narrator stresses the author’s intent of providing open-ended messages when writing poetry while audiences fail to appreciate poetry properly, instead seeing them as intellectual burdens. This struggle is shown by the shocking personifications and imagery in the final two stanzas of “[tying] the poem to a chair with rope/and [torturing] a confession out of it… and [torturing] a confession out of it.” These highly charged descriptions show how disappointed poets become when they realize that their poetry stresses student readers in understanding the poems rather than…
Read More

Why Do People Need to Confess: The Analysis of Poe’s Poetry

In his essay, “The Philosophy of Composition,” Edgar Allan Poe writes that in an ideal poem, “two things are invariably required first, some amount of complexity, or more properly, adaptation; and, secondly, some amount of suggestiveness some under-current, however indefinite, of meaning.” While he claims to use this statement to justify the “suggestiveness” of the final two stanzas of “The Raven,” he points at a more universal under-current that lies behind several of his poems, particularly those about deceased women. In poems such as “Annabel Lee” and “The Raven,” the speaker covertly confesses to murdering the women about whom they are written. The complexity of these poems lies in the…
Read More

Escapism in the Poetry of Freneau, Bryant, and Poe

The theme of escape has long been regarded as a powerful and timeless one in various works of literature, and in poetry more specifically. Escapism is a dominant and prevailing topic in poetry as it reveals an alternative existence to living a life of struggle, hardship, and sadness. Escapism can be sought through dreams where the reality of day to day life can temporarily be evaded, through nature where peace and solace can be found, or even through belief in religion where trusting in faith can help one surpass current challenges. Poets Philip Freneau, William Cullen Bryant, and Edgar Allan Poe all seem to address the enduring theme of escape…
Read More

The Human Experience in Bruce Dawe’s Poetry

A poet who energetically contemplated the world around him, Dawe wasn’t just a devoted Australian wordsmith with a dream that his work would one day be analysed. He was a book full of ideas, complex ideas, often about the essence of life and beyond. Through his poems Bedroom Conversations, Up The Wall, and Enter Without So Much As Knocking, Dawe presents his intricate view of the human experience in an interesting light, one that illuminates both the paradoxes and the cynicism of our world. Bruce Dawe explores the human experience as a paradoxical cycle that is heavily dependent on the cynical nature of society. Although this nature brings society together…
Read More

What Is Performance Poetry All About: A Detailed Analysis of The Blue Roofs of Japan

“To listen is to simultaneously attend to what is present and what is absent”. In “Understanding the Sound of Not Understanding,” Jed Rasula analyses the impact of the spoken word on the understanding of poetry. Historically, poetry, and most literary forms, started as an oral tradition. They were sung by barbs in various cultures. The very notion of poetry, originating from the the ancient Greek poiesis meaning “to create”, has always implied a way of structuring sound to create meaning. However, the actual sound in poetry is undeniably the most overlooked aspect of the art form. The convention has long been to study what the poem “says” and not take…
Read More

The Poetry of Sylvia Plath

That said, the poem gains its most sinister and perhaps most powerful energies from deeply autobiographical confession. That “Daddy” was written by Plath as an exercise in personal catharsis, as well as a lyric poem meant to excite large audiences, is obvious. The lines which seemingly abruptly refer to San Francisco: “Ghastly statue with one gray toe / Big as a Frisco Seal / And a head in the freakish Atlantic. ” identify the daddy in the poem “as a colossus who stretches across America from the Atlantic to the Pacific–a colossus even larger than the one described in “The Colossus. ” These seemingly obscure details are in fact references…
Read More

Percy Bysshe Shelley: Poetry and the Individual

Working at the height of the Romantic Era, Percy Bysshe Shelley set the standard for literature of the period. Consistently using the conventional comparisons between humans and nature, Shelley in his poetry emphasizes man’s ability to remove himself from the commonplace and initiate change, and to produce new ideas through the power of imagination and creativity. Similarly in A Defense of Poetry, Shelley attempts to establish poetry’s place in a rapidly changing, industrialized world. He wrote his defense in response to Thomas Love Peacock’s The Four Ages of Poetry, which urged great minds to stop wasting their time with humanities, especially poetry, and put their intellectual efforts toward the newly…
Read More

Controversial Genius of Donne’s Poetry

Donne is sick and his poetry is sick. – Stanley Fish Fish’s comment, though extreme in its reductive appraisal, is nevertheless understandable. He may find Donne’s poetry objectionable on three accounts: style, explicitness, and morbidity. With regards to style, Fish says Donne “is bulimic…someone who gorges himself to a point beyond satiety, and then sticks his finger down his throat and throws up.” And Fish is certainly not alone in this sentiment. C.S. Lewis called Donne the “saddest” and most “uncomfortable” of our poets, whose verse “exercises the same dreadful fascination that we feel in the grip of the worst kind of bore – the hot-eyed, inescapable kind.” For his…
Read More

An Interpretation of Horace’s Art of Poetry Essay

He criticized the Romans for being indulgent and mercenary. Since everybody was so captive in gaining money. he asked. “what poems can we anticipate to compose deserving surfacing with protective oils and hive awaying in all right wood? ” ( 129 ) . To Horace. money was non the primary motive to prosecute his composing calling. and that explained why Horace rejected Augustus’s offer to go his secretary. which was an honest place for a freed adult male. With his great virtuousnesss and ethical motives. Horace was doubtless one of the best poets in the Roman Empire. Horace’s Hagiographas revealed the dominant Hellenic influence. They were facile and extremely rational.…
Read More

Jessie Pope Poetry

The tone carries on insistently and repetitively putting stress on the question, and on the last word of each line – ‘hand? ‘, ‘stand? ‘, ‘gun? ‘, ‘run? ‘. The insistence seems impossible to resist, like a constant drum beat inside the soldiers minds making the soldiers feel like they have no alternative but to go to war. ‘Dulce et Decorum est’ has an accusatory tone; this tone is directed mockingly at “my friend”, particularly in the last stanza. The poet’s anger builds and the use of the direct and accusatory tone excels. The poet gives his description impact by speaking in the present tense – ‘guttering, choking, drowning’, this…
Read More

The Conflict of the Frustration of Poets in Introduction to Poetry, a Poem by Billy Collins

Billy Collin’s poem, Introduction to Poetry, dramatizes conflict of poets’ frustration when their work is overanalyzed instead of being enjoyed. More specifically, this poem’s narrator stresses the author’s intent of providing open-ended messages when writing poetry while audiences fail to appreciate poetry properly, instead seeing them as intellectual burdens. This struggle is shown by the shocking personifications and imagery in the final two stanzas of “[tying] the poem to a chair with rope/and [torturing] a confession out of it… and [torturing] a confession out of it.” These highly charged descriptions show how disappointed poets become when they realize that their poetry stresses student readers in understanding the poems rather than…
Read More

Why Do People Need to Confess: The Analysis of Poe’s Poetry

In his essay, “The Philosophy of Composition,” Edgar Allan Poe writes that in an ideal poem, “two things are invariably required first, some amount of complexity, or more properly, adaptation; and, secondly, some amount of suggestiveness some under-current, however indefinite, of meaning.” While he claims to use this statement to justify the “suggestiveness” of the final two stanzas of “The Raven,” he points at a more universal under-current that lies behind several of his poems, particularly those about deceased women. In poems such as “Annabel Lee” and “The Raven,” the speaker covertly confesses to murdering the women about whom they are written. The complexity of these poems lies in the…
Read More

Escapism in the Poetry of Freneau, Bryant, and Poe

The theme of escape has long been regarded as a powerful and timeless one in various works of literature, and in poetry more specifically. Escapism is a dominant and prevailing topic in poetry as it reveals an alternative existence to living a life of struggle, hardship, and sadness. Escapism can be sought through dreams where the reality of day to day life can temporarily be evaded, through nature where peace and solace can be found, or even through belief in religion where trusting in faith can help one surpass current challenges. Poets Philip Freneau, William Cullen Bryant, and Edgar Allan Poe all seem to address the enduring theme of escape…
Read More

The Human Experience in Bruce Dawe’s Poetry

A poet who energetically contemplated the world around him, Dawe wasn’t just a devoted Australian wordsmith with a dream that his work would one day be analysed. He was a book full of ideas, complex ideas, often about the essence of life and beyond. Through his poems Bedroom Conversations, Up The Wall, and Enter Without So Much As Knocking, Dawe presents his intricate view of the human experience in an interesting light, one that illuminates both the paradoxes and the cynicism of our world. Bruce Dawe explores the human experience as a paradoxical cycle that is heavily dependent on the cynical nature of society. Although this nature brings society together…
Read More

What Is Performance Poetry All About: A Detailed Analysis of The Blue Roofs of Japan

“To listen is to simultaneously attend to what is present and what is absent”. In “Understanding the Sound of Not Understanding,” Jed Rasula analyses the impact of the spoken word on the understanding of poetry. Historically, poetry, and most literary forms, started as an oral tradition. They were sung by barbs in various cultures. The very notion of poetry, originating from the the ancient Greek poiesis meaning “to create”, has always implied a way of structuring sound to create meaning. However, the actual sound in poetry is undeniably the most overlooked aspect of the art form. The convention has long been to study what the poem “says” and not take…
Read More

The Poetry of Sylvia Plath

That said, the poem gains its most sinister and perhaps most powerful energies from deeply autobiographical confession. That “Daddy” was written by Plath as an exercise in personal catharsis, as well as a lyric poem meant to excite large audiences, is obvious. The lines which seemingly abruptly refer to San Francisco: “Ghastly statue with one gray toe / Big as a Frisco Seal / And a head in the freakish Atlantic. ” identify the daddy in the poem “as a colossus who stretches across America from the Atlantic to the Pacific–a colossus even larger than the one described in “The Colossus. ” These seemingly obscure details are in fact references…
Read More

Percy Bysshe Shelley: Poetry and the Individual

Working at the height of the Romantic Era, Percy Bysshe Shelley set the standard for literature of the period. Consistently using the conventional comparisons between humans and nature, Shelley in his poetry emphasizes man’s ability to remove himself from the commonplace and initiate change, and to produce new ideas through the power of imagination and creativity. Similarly in A Defense of Poetry, Shelley attempts to establish poetry’s place in a rapidly changing, industrialized world. He wrote his defense in response to Thomas Love Peacock’s The Four Ages of Poetry, which urged great minds to stop wasting their time with humanities, especially poetry, and put their intellectual efforts toward the newly…
Read More

Controversial Genius of Donne’s Poetry

Donne is sick and his poetry is sick. – Stanley Fish Fish’s comment, though extreme in its reductive appraisal, is nevertheless understandable. He may find Donne’s poetry objectionable on three accounts: style, explicitness, and morbidity. With regards to style, Fish says Donne “is bulimic…someone who gorges himself to a point beyond satiety, and then sticks his finger down his throat and throws up.” And Fish is certainly not alone in this sentiment. C.S. Lewis called Donne the “saddest” and most “uncomfortable” of our poets, whose verse “exercises the same dreadful fascination that we feel in the grip of the worst kind of bore – the hot-eyed, inescapable kind.” For his…
Read More

An Interpretation of Horace’s Art of Poetry Essay

He criticized the Romans for being indulgent and mercenary. Since everybody was so captive in gaining money. he asked. “what poems can we anticipate to compose deserving surfacing with protective oils and hive awaying in all right wood? ” ( 129 ) . To Horace. money was non the primary motive to prosecute his composing calling. and that explained why Horace rejected Augustus’s offer to go his secretary. which was an honest place for a freed adult male. With his great virtuousnesss and ethical motives. Horace was doubtless one of the best poets in the Roman Empire. Horace’s Hagiographas revealed the dominant Hellenic influence. They were facile and extremely rational.…
Read More

Jessie Pope Poetry

The tone carries on insistently and repetitively putting stress on the question, and on the last word of each line – ‘hand? ‘, ‘stand? ‘, ‘gun? ‘, ‘run? ‘. The insistence seems impossible to resist, like a constant drum beat inside the soldiers minds making the soldiers feel like they have no alternative but to go to war. ‘Dulce et Decorum est’ has an accusatory tone; this tone is directed mockingly at “my friend”, particularly in the last stanza. The poet’s anger builds and the use of the direct and accusatory tone excels. The poet gives his description impact by speaking in the present tense – ‘guttering, choking, drowning’, this…
Read More

The Conflict of the Frustration of Poets in Introduction to Poetry, a Poem by Billy Collins

Billy Collin’s poem, Introduction to Poetry, dramatizes conflict of poets’ frustration when their work is overanalyzed instead of being enjoyed. More specifically, this poem’s narrator stresses the author’s intent of providing open-ended messages when writing poetry while audiences fail to appreciate poetry properly, instead seeing them as intellectual burdens. This struggle is shown by the shocking personifications and imagery in the final two stanzas of “[tying] the poem to a chair with rope/and [torturing] a confession out of it… and [torturing] a confession out of it.” These highly charged descriptions show how disappointed poets become when they realize that their poetry stresses student readers in understanding the poems rather than…
Read More

Why Do People Need to Confess: The Analysis of Poe’s Poetry

In his essay, “The Philosophy of Composition,” Edgar Allan Poe writes that in an ideal poem, “two things are invariably required first, some amount of complexity, or more properly, adaptation; and, secondly, some amount of suggestiveness some under-current, however indefinite, of meaning.” While he claims to use this statement to justify the “suggestiveness” of the final two stanzas of “The Raven,” he points at a more universal under-current that lies behind several of his poems, particularly those about deceased women. In poems such as “Annabel Lee” and “The Raven,” the speaker covertly confesses to murdering the women about whom they are written. The complexity of these poems lies in the…
Read More

Escapism in the Poetry of Freneau, Bryant, and Poe

The theme of escape has long been regarded as a powerful and timeless one in various works of literature, and in poetry more specifically. Escapism is a dominant and prevailing topic in poetry as it reveals an alternative existence to living a life of struggle, hardship, and sadness. Escapism can be sought through dreams where the reality of day to day life can temporarily be evaded, through nature where peace and solace can be found, or even through belief in religion where trusting in faith can help one surpass current challenges. Poets Philip Freneau, William Cullen Bryant, and Edgar Allan Poe all seem to address the enduring theme of escape…
Read More

The Human Experience in Bruce Dawe’s Poetry

A poet who energetically contemplated the world around him, Dawe wasn’t just a devoted Australian wordsmith with a dream that his work would one day be analysed. He was a book full of ideas, complex ideas, often about the essence of life and beyond. Through his poems Bedroom Conversations, Up The Wall, and Enter Without So Much As Knocking, Dawe presents his intricate view of the human experience in an interesting light, one that illuminates both the paradoxes and the cynicism of our world. Bruce Dawe explores the human experience as a paradoxical cycle that is heavily dependent on the cynical nature of society. Although this nature brings society together…
Read More

What Is Performance Poetry All About: A Detailed Analysis of The Blue Roofs of Japan

“To listen is to simultaneously attend to what is present and what is absent”. In “Understanding the Sound of Not Understanding,” Jed Rasula analyses the impact of the spoken word on the understanding of poetry. Historically, poetry, and most literary forms, started as an oral tradition. They were sung by barbs in various cultures. The very notion of poetry, originating from the the ancient Greek poiesis meaning “to create”, has always implied a way of structuring sound to create meaning. However, the actual sound in poetry is undeniably the most overlooked aspect of the art form. The convention has long been to study what the poem “says” and not take…
Read More

The Poetry of Sylvia Plath

That said, the poem gains its most sinister and perhaps most powerful energies from deeply autobiographical confession. That “Daddy” was written by Plath as an exercise in personal catharsis, as well as a lyric poem meant to excite large audiences, is obvious. The lines which seemingly abruptly refer to San Francisco: “Ghastly statue with one gray toe / Big as a Frisco Seal / And a head in the freakish Atlantic. ” identify the daddy in the poem “as a colossus who stretches across America from the Atlantic to the Pacific–a colossus even larger than the one described in “The Colossus. ” These seemingly obscure details are in fact references…
Read More

Percy Bysshe Shelley: Poetry and the Individual

Working at the height of the Romantic Era, Percy Bysshe Shelley set the standard for literature of the period. Consistently using the conventional comparisons between humans and nature, Shelley in his poetry emphasizes man’s ability to remove himself from the commonplace and initiate change, and to produce new ideas through the power of imagination and creativity. Similarly in A Defense of Poetry, Shelley attempts to establish poetry’s place in a rapidly changing, industrialized world. He wrote his defense in response to Thomas Love Peacock’s The Four Ages of Poetry, which urged great minds to stop wasting their time with humanities, especially poetry, and put their intellectual efforts toward the newly…
Read More

Controversial Genius of Donne’s Poetry

Donne is sick and his poetry is sick. – Stanley Fish Fish’s comment, though extreme in its reductive appraisal, is nevertheless understandable. He may find Donne’s poetry objectionable on three accounts: style, explicitness, and morbidity. With regards to style, Fish says Donne “is bulimic…someone who gorges himself to a point beyond satiety, and then sticks his finger down his throat and throws up.” And Fish is certainly not alone in this sentiment. C.S. Lewis called Donne the “saddest” and most “uncomfortable” of our poets, whose verse “exercises the same dreadful fascination that we feel in the grip of the worst kind of bore – the hot-eyed, inescapable kind.” For his…
Read More

An Interpretation of Horace’s Art of Poetry Essay

He criticized the Romans for being indulgent and mercenary. Since everybody was so captive in gaining money. he asked. “what poems can we anticipate to compose deserving surfacing with protective oils and hive awaying in all right wood? ” ( 129 ) . To Horace. money was non the primary motive to prosecute his composing calling. and that explained why Horace rejected Augustus’s offer to go his secretary. which was an honest place for a freed adult male. With his great virtuousnesss and ethical motives. Horace was doubtless one of the best poets in the Roman Empire. Horace’s Hagiographas revealed the dominant Hellenic influence. They were facile and extremely rational.…
Read More

Jessie Pope Poetry

The tone carries on insistently and repetitively putting stress on the question, and on the last word of each line – ‘hand? ‘, ‘stand? ‘, ‘gun? ‘, ‘run? ‘. The insistence seems impossible to resist, like a constant drum beat inside the soldiers minds making the soldiers feel like they have no alternative but to go to war. ‘Dulce et Decorum est’ has an accusatory tone; this tone is directed mockingly at “my friend”, particularly in the last stanza. The poet’s anger builds and the use of the direct and accusatory tone excels. The poet gives his description impact by speaking in the present tense – ‘guttering, choking, drowning’, this…
Read More

The Conflict of the Frustration of Poets in Introduction to Poetry, a Poem by Billy Collins

Billy Collin’s poem, Introduction to Poetry, dramatizes conflict of poets’ frustration when their work is overanalyzed instead of being enjoyed. More specifically, this poem’s narrator stresses the author’s intent of providing open-ended messages when writing poetry while audiences fail to appreciate poetry properly, instead seeing them as intellectual burdens. This struggle is shown by the shocking personifications and imagery in the final two stanzas of “[tying] the poem to a chair with rope/and [torturing] a confession out of it… and [torturing] a confession out of it.” These highly charged descriptions show how disappointed poets become when they realize that their poetry stresses student readers in understanding the poems rather than…
Read More

Why Do People Need to Confess: The Analysis of Poe’s Poetry

In his essay, “The Philosophy of Composition,” Edgar Allan Poe writes that in an ideal poem, “two things are invariably required first, some amount of complexity, or more properly, adaptation; and, secondly, some amount of suggestiveness some under-current, however indefinite, of meaning.” While he claims to use this statement to justify the “suggestiveness” of the final two stanzas of “The Raven,” he points at a more universal under-current that lies behind several of his poems, particularly those about deceased women. In poems such as “Annabel Lee” and “The Raven,” the speaker covertly confesses to murdering the women about whom they are written. The complexity of these poems lies in the…
Read More

Escapism in the Poetry of Freneau, Bryant, and Poe

The theme of escape has long been regarded as a powerful and timeless one in various works of literature, and in poetry more specifically. Escapism is a dominant and prevailing topic in poetry as it reveals an alternative existence to living a life of struggle, hardship, and sadness. Escapism can be sought through dreams where the reality of day to day life can temporarily be evaded, through nature where peace and solace can be found, or even through belief in religion where trusting in faith can help one surpass current challenges. Poets Philip Freneau, William Cullen Bryant, and Edgar Allan Poe all seem to address the enduring theme of escape…
Read More

The Human Experience in Bruce Dawe’s Poetry

A poet who energetically contemplated the world around him, Dawe wasn’t just a devoted Australian wordsmith with a dream that his work would one day be analysed. He was a book full of ideas, complex ideas, often about the essence of life and beyond. Through his poems Bedroom Conversations, Up The Wall, and Enter Without So Much As Knocking, Dawe presents his intricate view of the human experience in an interesting light, one that illuminates both the paradoxes and the cynicism of our world. Bruce Dawe explores the human experience as a paradoxical cycle that is heavily dependent on the cynical nature of society. Although this nature brings society together…
Read More

What Is Performance Poetry All About: A Detailed Analysis of The Blue Roofs of Japan

“To listen is to simultaneously attend to what is present and what is absent”. In “Understanding the Sound of Not Understanding,” Jed Rasula analyses the impact of the spoken word on the understanding of poetry. Historically, poetry, and most literary forms, started as an oral tradition. They were sung by barbs in various cultures. The very notion of poetry, originating from the the ancient Greek poiesis meaning “to create”, has always implied a way of structuring sound to create meaning. However, the actual sound in poetry is undeniably the most overlooked aspect of the art form. The convention has long been to study what the poem “says” and not take…
Read More

The Poetry of Sylvia Plath

That said, the poem gains its most sinister and perhaps most powerful energies from deeply autobiographical confession. That “Daddy” was written by Plath as an exercise in personal catharsis, as well as a lyric poem meant to excite large audiences, is obvious. The lines which seemingly abruptly refer to San Francisco: “Ghastly statue with one gray toe / Big as a Frisco Seal / And a head in the freakish Atlantic. ” identify the daddy in the poem “as a colossus who stretches across America from the Atlantic to the Pacific–a colossus even larger than the one described in “The Colossus. ” These seemingly obscure details are in fact references…
Read More

Percy Bysshe Shelley: Poetry and the Individual

Working at the height of the Romantic Era, Percy Bysshe Shelley set the standard for literature of the period. Consistently using the conventional comparisons between humans and nature, Shelley in his poetry emphasizes man’s ability to remove himself from the commonplace and initiate change, and to produce new ideas through the power of imagination and creativity. Similarly in A Defense of Poetry, Shelley attempts to establish poetry’s place in a rapidly changing, industrialized world. He wrote his defense in response to Thomas Love Peacock’s The Four Ages of Poetry, which urged great minds to stop wasting their time with humanities, especially poetry, and put their intellectual efforts toward the newly…
Read More

Controversial Genius of Donne’s Poetry

Donne is sick and his poetry is sick. – Stanley Fish Fish’s comment, though extreme in its reductive appraisal, is nevertheless understandable. He may find Donne’s poetry objectionable on three accounts: style, explicitness, and morbidity. With regards to style, Fish says Donne “is bulimic…someone who gorges himself to a point beyond satiety, and then sticks his finger down his throat and throws up.” And Fish is certainly not alone in this sentiment. C.S. Lewis called Donne the “saddest” and most “uncomfortable” of our poets, whose verse “exercises the same dreadful fascination that we feel in the grip of the worst kind of bore – the hot-eyed, inescapable kind.” For his…
Read More

An Interpretation of Horace’s Art of Poetry Essay

He criticized the Romans for being indulgent and mercenary. Since everybody was so captive in gaining money. he asked. “what poems can we anticipate to compose deserving surfacing with protective oils and hive awaying in all right wood? ” ( 129 ) . To Horace. money was non the primary motive to prosecute his composing calling. and that explained why Horace rejected Augustus’s offer to go his secretary. which was an honest place for a freed adult male. With his great virtuousnesss and ethical motives. Horace was doubtless one of the best poets in the Roman Empire. Horace’s Hagiographas revealed the dominant Hellenic influence. They were facile and extremely rational.…
Read More

Jessie Pope Poetry

The tone carries on insistently and repetitively putting stress on the question, and on the last word of each line – ‘hand? ‘, ‘stand? ‘, ‘gun? ‘, ‘run? ‘. The insistence seems impossible to resist, like a constant drum beat inside the soldiers minds making the soldiers feel like they have no alternative but to go to war. ‘Dulce et Decorum est’ has an accusatory tone; this tone is directed mockingly at “my friend”, particularly in the last stanza. The poet’s anger builds and the use of the direct and accusatory tone excels. The poet gives his description impact by speaking in the present tense – ‘guttering, choking, drowning’, this…
Read More

The Conflict of the Frustration of Poets in Introduction to Poetry, a Poem by Billy Collins

Billy Collin’s poem, Introduction to Poetry, dramatizes conflict of poets’ frustration when their work is overanalyzed instead of being enjoyed. More specifically, this poem’s narrator stresses the author’s intent of providing open-ended messages when writing poetry while audiences fail to appreciate poetry properly, instead seeing them as intellectual burdens. This struggle is shown by the shocking personifications and imagery in the final two stanzas of “[tying] the poem to a chair with rope/and [torturing] a confession out of it… and [torturing] a confession out of it.” These highly charged descriptions show how disappointed poets become when they realize that their poetry stresses student readers in understanding the poems rather than…
Read More

Why Do People Need to Confess: The Analysis of Poe’s Poetry

In his essay, “The Philosophy of Composition,” Edgar Allan Poe writes that in an ideal poem, “two things are invariably required first, some amount of complexity, or more properly, adaptation; and, secondly, some amount of suggestiveness some under-current, however indefinite, of meaning.” While he claims to use this statement to justify the “suggestiveness” of the final two stanzas of “The Raven,” he points at a more universal under-current that lies behind several of his poems, particularly those about deceased women. In poems such as “Annabel Lee” and “The Raven,” the speaker covertly confesses to murdering the women about whom they are written. The complexity of these poems lies in the…
Read More

Escapism in the Poetry of Freneau, Bryant, and Poe

The theme of escape has long been regarded as a powerful and timeless one in various works of literature, and in poetry more specifically. Escapism is a dominant and prevailing topic in poetry as it reveals an alternative existence to living a life of struggle, hardship, and sadness. Escapism can be sought through dreams where the reality of day to day life can temporarily be evaded, through nature where peace and solace can be found, or even through belief in religion where trusting in faith can help one surpass current challenges. Poets Philip Freneau, William Cullen Bryant, and Edgar Allan Poe all seem to address the enduring theme of escape…
Read More

The Human Experience in Bruce Dawe’s Poetry

A poet who energetically contemplated the world around him, Dawe wasn’t just a devoted Australian wordsmith with a dream that his work would one day be analysed. He was a book full of ideas, complex ideas, often about the essence of life and beyond. Through his poems Bedroom Conversations, Up The Wall, and Enter Without So Much As Knocking, Dawe presents his intricate view of the human experience in an interesting light, one that illuminates both the paradoxes and the cynicism of our world. Bruce Dawe explores the human experience as a paradoxical cycle that is heavily dependent on the cynical nature of society. Although this nature brings society together…
Read More

What Is Performance Poetry All About: A Detailed Analysis of The Blue Roofs of Japan

“To listen is to simultaneously attend to what is present and what is absent”. In “Understanding the Sound of Not Understanding,” Jed Rasula analyses the impact of the spoken word on the understanding of poetry. Historically, poetry, and most literary forms, started as an oral tradition. They were sung by barbs in various cultures. The very notion of poetry, originating from the the ancient Greek poiesis meaning “to create”, has always implied a way of structuring sound to create meaning. However, the actual sound in poetry is undeniably the most overlooked aspect of the art form. The convention has long been to study what the poem “says” and not take…
Read More

The Poetry of Sylvia Plath

That said, the poem gains its most sinister and perhaps most powerful energies from deeply autobiographical confession. That “Daddy” was written by Plath as an exercise in personal catharsis, as well as a lyric poem meant to excite large audiences, is obvious. The lines which seemingly abruptly refer to San Francisco: “Ghastly statue with one gray toe / Big as a Frisco Seal / And a head in the freakish Atlantic. ” identify the daddy in the poem “as a colossus who stretches across America from the Atlantic to the Pacific–a colossus even larger than the one described in “The Colossus. ” These seemingly obscure details are in fact references…
Read More

Percy Bysshe Shelley: Poetry and the Individual

Working at the height of the Romantic Era, Percy Bysshe Shelley set the standard for literature of the period. Consistently using the conventional comparisons between humans and nature, Shelley in his poetry emphasizes man’s ability to remove himself from the commonplace and initiate change, and to produce new ideas through the power of imagination and creativity. Similarly in A Defense of Poetry, Shelley attempts to establish poetry’s place in a rapidly changing, industrialized world. He wrote his defense in response to Thomas Love Peacock’s The Four Ages of Poetry, which urged great minds to stop wasting their time with humanities, especially poetry, and put their intellectual efforts toward the newly…
Read More

Controversial Genius of Donne’s Poetry

Donne is sick and his poetry is sick. – Stanley Fish Fish’s comment, though extreme in its reductive appraisal, is nevertheless understandable. He may find Donne’s poetry objectionable on three accounts: style, explicitness, and morbidity. With regards to style, Fish says Donne “is bulimic…someone who gorges himself to a point beyond satiety, and then sticks his finger down his throat and throws up.” And Fish is certainly not alone in this sentiment. C.S. Lewis called Donne the “saddest” and most “uncomfortable” of our poets, whose verse “exercises the same dreadful fascination that we feel in the grip of the worst kind of bore – the hot-eyed, inescapable kind.” For his…
Read More

An Interpretation of Horace’s Art of Poetry Essay

He criticized the Romans for being indulgent and mercenary. Since everybody was so captive in gaining money. he asked. “what poems can we anticipate to compose deserving surfacing with protective oils and hive awaying in all right wood? ” ( 129 ) . To Horace. money was non the primary motive to prosecute his composing calling. and that explained why Horace rejected Augustus’s offer to go his secretary. which was an honest place for a freed adult male. With his great virtuousnesss and ethical motives. Horace was doubtless one of the best poets in the Roman Empire. Horace’s Hagiographas revealed the dominant Hellenic influence. They were facile and extremely rational.…
Read More

Jessie Pope Poetry

The tone carries on insistently and repetitively putting stress on the question, and on the last word of each line – ‘hand? ‘, ‘stand? ‘, ‘gun? ‘, ‘run? ‘. The insistence seems impossible to resist, like a constant drum beat inside the soldiers minds making the soldiers feel like they have no alternative but to go to war. ‘Dulce et Decorum est’ has an accusatory tone; this tone is directed mockingly at “my friend”, particularly in the last stanza. The poet’s anger builds and the use of the direct and accusatory tone excels. The poet gives his description impact by speaking in the present tense – ‘guttering, choking, drowning’, this…
Read More

The Conflict of the Frustration of Poets in Introduction to Poetry, a Poem by Billy Collins

Billy Collin’s poem, Introduction to Poetry, dramatizes conflict of poets’ frustration when their work is overanalyzed instead of being enjoyed. More specifically, this poem’s narrator stresses the author’s intent of providing open-ended messages when writing poetry while audiences fail to appreciate poetry properly, instead seeing them as intellectual burdens. This struggle is shown by the shocking personifications and imagery in the final two stanzas of “[tying] the poem to a chair with rope/and [torturing] a confession out of it… and [torturing] a confession out of it.” These highly charged descriptions show how disappointed poets become when they realize that their poetry stresses student readers in understanding the poems rather than…
Read More

Why Do People Need to Confess: The Analysis of Poe’s Poetry

In his essay, “The Philosophy of Composition,” Edgar Allan Poe writes that in an ideal poem, “two things are invariably required first, some amount of complexity, or more properly, adaptation; and, secondly, some amount of suggestiveness some under-current, however indefinite, of meaning.” While he claims to use this statement to justify the “suggestiveness” of the final two stanzas of “The Raven,” he points at a more universal under-current that lies behind several of his poems, particularly those about deceased women. In poems such as “Annabel Lee” and “The Raven,” the speaker covertly confesses to murdering the women about whom they are written. The complexity of these poems lies in the…
Read More

Escapism in the Poetry of Freneau, Bryant, and Poe

The theme of escape has long been regarded as a powerful and timeless one in various works of literature, and in poetry more specifically. Escapism is a dominant and prevailing topic in poetry as it reveals an alternative existence to living a life of struggle, hardship, and sadness. Escapism can be sought through dreams where the reality of day to day life can temporarily be evaded, through nature where peace and solace can be found, or even through belief in religion where trusting in faith can help one surpass current challenges. Poets Philip Freneau, William Cullen Bryant, and Edgar Allan Poe all seem to address the enduring theme of escape…
Read More

The Human Experience in Bruce Dawe’s Poetry

A poet who energetically contemplated the world around him, Dawe wasn’t just a devoted Australian wordsmith with a dream that his work would one day be analysed. He was a book full of ideas, complex ideas, often about the essence of life and beyond. Through his poems Bedroom Conversations, Up The Wall, and Enter Without So Much As Knocking, Dawe presents his intricate view of the human experience in an interesting light, one that illuminates both the paradoxes and the cynicism of our world. Bruce Dawe explores the human experience as a paradoxical cycle that is heavily dependent on the cynical nature of society. Although this nature brings society together…
Read More

What Is Performance Poetry All About: A Detailed Analysis of The Blue Roofs of Japan

“To listen is to simultaneously attend to what is present and what is absent”. In “Understanding the Sound of Not Understanding,” Jed Rasula analyses the impact of the spoken word on the understanding of poetry. Historically, poetry, and most literary forms, started as an oral tradition. They were sung by barbs in various cultures. The very notion of poetry, originating from the the ancient Greek poiesis meaning “to create”, has always implied a way of structuring sound to create meaning. However, the actual sound in poetry is undeniably the most overlooked aspect of the art form. The convention has long been to study what the poem “says” and not take…
Read More

The Poetry of Sylvia Plath

That said, the poem gains its most sinister and perhaps most powerful energies from deeply autobiographical confession. That “Daddy” was written by Plath as an exercise in personal catharsis, as well as a lyric poem meant to excite large audiences, is obvious. The lines which seemingly abruptly refer to San Francisco: “Ghastly statue with one gray toe / Big as a Frisco Seal / And a head in the freakish Atlantic. ” identify the daddy in the poem “as a colossus who stretches across America from the Atlantic to the Pacific–a colossus even larger than the one described in “The Colossus. ” These seemingly obscure details are in fact references…
Read More