Memory and Retrospection in Duffy’s Poetry

In both “Before You Were Mine” and “Brothers,” Carol Ann Duffy uses descriptions of memory as a means of re-living past family life. Throughout “Before You Were Mine,” Duffy writes about her mother, and imagines her life before motherhood. This poem is designed as Duffy’s recollection of her mother through her mother’s own memories, and her recognition of all she was before the responsibilities and commitment on having children came into her life. Duffy seeks to reanimate and capture what her mother was like when she was younger, and does so by re-living her past through imaginings of what her mother’s memories might have been. We get the impression that…
Read More

How to Write About Poetry Essay

Poetry may be considered as a picture or chalk out done in words instead than in ink or colour. To compose about poesy we must hold an apprehension of what the poet is seeking to pass on. For this we need to put ourselves in the poets’ places and understands his sentiments and construe his looks accurately & A ; right. To get down composing about poesy we need to see approximately ten of import points. First. see the nature of the verse form i. e. the flow of ideas that form the verse form. The flow needs to be mentioned when the basic elements of the verse form are…
Read More

Study Of Poetry

An Essay Study of Poetry andA Poet’s Ability to ForseeThe FutureThe world is changing and evolving at an astounding rate. Within the lastone hundred years, the Western community has seen advances in technologyand medicine that has improved the lifestyles and longevity of almostevery individual. Within the last two hundred years, we have seen twoWorld Wars, and countless disputes over false borders created bycolonialists, slavery, and every horrid form of human sufferingimaginable! Human lifestyles and cultures are changing every minute. Whileour grandparents and ancestors were growing-up, do you think that theyever imagined the world we live in today? What is to come is almostinconceivable to us now. In this world, the…
Read More

Komunyakaa’s “Untitled Blues”: Confronting Racial Injustice Through Poetry

Although the majority of Yusef Komunyakaa’s poem “Untitled Blues” portrays descriptive and vivid scenes of music, dancing, and joy, these images are merely distractions from the deeper message that hides within the lines of the piece. Images of “tap dancers [who] hold / to the last steps” (32-33) as people who “jive / down on Bourbon & Conti” (31-32) and of “drunks discussing God / around a honky-tonk piano” (16-17), come together to act as a mask, behind which struggle, crises, and injustice hide. Komunyakaa highlights the reoccurring pattern throughout history, in which society hides from pressing issues, and instead, focuses on the bright side, making finding solutions nearly impossible.…
Read More

Modernism in the Poetry of T.S. Eliot and Christopher Okigbo

Christopher Okigbo’s poetry has often been compared to that of T. S. Eliot, partly because Okigbo uses Eliot’s signature linguistic devices such as exploiting metaphor to create a densely symbolic dimension to his poetry. In addition, he also appears at times to be consciously invoking comparisons with Eliot through such means as similarity of titles, as in the correspondence between his own Four Canzones and Eliot’s Four Quartets. Also like Eliot, Okigbo’s poetry forces a critical assessment that moves beyond the content of the works themselves to enlarge the discussion about broader topics such as the meaning of poetry and the purpose of the poet in modern society. Christopher Okigbo’s…
Read More

Understanding Poetry Essay

Teachers have been talking about the deficiency of critical stuff on some of the literature set pieces ( peculiarly the verse forms ) selected for survey at the Caribbean O’Level. Diverse readings make an geographic expedition of literary stuff interesting and expansive. This usher to the survey of ‘set’ poems is a response to those who wish to be expansive in their analysis and grasp. It is non intended to be a exemplary commentary but an analysis or reading that will excite farther treatment and analysis. Some verse forms are treated with inquiries. This attack helps to clarify the cardinal subjects or thoughts in the verse forms. This is a…
Read More

The Imagery of Landscape in the Poetry of the First World War: From Rupert Brooke to Edward Thomas

At the turn of the nineteenth century, and the start of the ‘War to end all Wars’, there was a rise in an exclusive kind of poetry, born in the suffering hands of the ‘War poet’. He is often seen in a state of despair, and combines the peaceful scenes of the preceding century with a sense of extreme pain and depression. It is the descriptions of landscape that this amalgamation is most clear, where the destruction of the peaceful and stable past is evident and where a new sense of misery is observed. The First World War had Britain ask itself if the country could ever return to its…
Read More

Vision through Voice: The Poetry of Basho in the English Language

In Narrow Road to the Deep North, Japanese poet Basho expresses himself masterfully through the traditional forms of haibun, covering themes of nature, folklore, faith, and journeys both physical and spiritual. All these stories and sentiments are contained within a haibun—a short piece of prose that tells the story and sets the mood—and meaningfully condensed into three lines in the haiku. The form seems simple—a short narrative, then three lines with a five-seven-five syllable pattern—which has lead many readers to regard it as a “children’s form”. It is this simplicity, however, that testifies to the brilliance of Basho. Such strict and simple parameters require precise and purposeful word choice—there is…
Read More

The Sweetest Poetry from the Land of the Free

Whitman in his preface explores America and its Poets. He showcases the USA as the greatest place in the world by showcasing its uniqueness compared to the rest of the world and that included showing how a poet should be. He gives a definition of what a poem is and how far its influence can reach.“A great poem is for ages and ages in common, and for all degrees and complexions, and all departments and sects, and for a woman as much as a man and a man as much as a woman”. In the following paragraph I will explain more on poetry and the uniqueness of the USA. To…
Read More

The Voices of the Voiceless: Comparing the Poetry of Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen

As two key figureheads in what is now deemed the Harlem Renaissance, Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen served as voices for a previously voiceless population. Their poetry speaks of the enduring struggles of being an African American, and the effort required to merely survive in such a discriminatory society. However, despite being poets with similar senses of purpose, their employed methods differed dramatically; Hughes and Cullen approach the field of poetry at two vastly different vantage points. While Hughes and Cullen differ in selections of speaker and audience, their core concepts of struggle, a faulty society, and a wise, complex narrator remain mutual. As blacks in 1920s America, Hughes and…
Read More

Memory and Retrospection in Duffy’s Poetry

In both “Before You Were Mine” and “Brothers,” Carol Ann Duffy uses descriptions of memory as a means of re-living past family life. Throughout “Before You Were Mine,” Duffy writes about her mother, and imagines her life before motherhood. This poem is designed as Duffy’s recollection of her mother through her mother’s own memories, and her recognition of all she was before the responsibilities and commitment on having children came into her life. Duffy seeks to reanimate and capture what her mother was like when she was younger, and does so by re-living her past through imaginings of what her mother’s memories might have been. We get the impression that…
Read More

How to Write About Poetry Essay

Poetry may be considered as a picture or chalk out done in words instead than in ink or colour. To compose about poesy we must hold an apprehension of what the poet is seeking to pass on. For this we need to put ourselves in the poets’ places and understands his sentiments and construe his looks accurately & A ; right. To get down composing about poesy we need to see approximately ten of import points. First. see the nature of the verse form i. e. the flow of ideas that form the verse form. The flow needs to be mentioned when the basic elements of the verse form are…
Read More

Study Of Poetry

An Essay Study of Poetry andA Poet’s Ability to ForseeThe FutureThe world is changing and evolving at an astounding rate. Within the lastone hundred years, the Western community has seen advances in technologyand medicine that has improved the lifestyles and longevity of almostevery individual. Within the last two hundred years, we have seen twoWorld Wars, and countless disputes over false borders created bycolonialists, slavery, and every horrid form of human sufferingimaginable! Human lifestyles and cultures are changing every minute. Whileour grandparents and ancestors were growing-up, do you think that theyever imagined the world we live in today? What is to come is almostinconceivable to us now. In this world, the…
Read More

Komunyakaa’s “Untitled Blues”: Confronting Racial Injustice Through Poetry

Although the majority of Yusef Komunyakaa’s poem “Untitled Blues” portrays descriptive and vivid scenes of music, dancing, and joy, these images are merely distractions from the deeper message that hides within the lines of the piece. Images of “tap dancers [who] hold / to the last steps” (32-33) as people who “jive / down on Bourbon & Conti” (31-32) and of “drunks discussing God / around a honky-tonk piano” (16-17), come together to act as a mask, behind which struggle, crises, and injustice hide. Komunyakaa highlights the reoccurring pattern throughout history, in which society hides from pressing issues, and instead, focuses on the bright side, making finding solutions nearly impossible.…
Read More

Modernism in the Poetry of T.S. Eliot and Christopher Okigbo

Christopher Okigbo’s poetry has often been compared to that of T. S. Eliot, partly because Okigbo uses Eliot’s signature linguistic devices such as exploiting metaphor to create a densely symbolic dimension to his poetry. In addition, he also appears at times to be consciously invoking comparisons with Eliot through such means as similarity of titles, as in the correspondence between his own Four Canzones and Eliot’s Four Quartets. Also like Eliot, Okigbo’s poetry forces a critical assessment that moves beyond the content of the works themselves to enlarge the discussion about broader topics such as the meaning of poetry and the purpose of the poet in modern society. Christopher Okigbo’s…
Read More

Understanding Poetry Essay

Teachers have been talking about the deficiency of critical stuff on some of the literature set pieces ( peculiarly the verse forms ) selected for survey at the Caribbean O’Level. Diverse readings make an geographic expedition of literary stuff interesting and expansive. This usher to the survey of ‘set’ poems is a response to those who wish to be expansive in their analysis and grasp. It is non intended to be a exemplary commentary but an analysis or reading that will excite farther treatment and analysis. Some verse forms are treated with inquiries. This attack helps to clarify the cardinal subjects or thoughts in the verse forms. This is a…
Read More

The Imagery of Landscape in the Poetry of the First World War: From Rupert Brooke to Edward Thomas

At the turn of the nineteenth century, and the start of the ‘War to end all Wars’, there was a rise in an exclusive kind of poetry, born in the suffering hands of the ‘War poet’. He is often seen in a state of despair, and combines the peaceful scenes of the preceding century with a sense of extreme pain and depression. It is the descriptions of landscape that this amalgamation is most clear, where the destruction of the peaceful and stable past is evident and where a new sense of misery is observed. The First World War had Britain ask itself if the country could ever return to its…
Read More

Vision through Voice: The Poetry of Basho in the English Language

In Narrow Road to the Deep North, Japanese poet Basho expresses himself masterfully through the traditional forms of haibun, covering themes of nature, folklore, faith, and journeys both physical and spiritual. All these stories and sentiments are contained within a haibun—a short piece of prose that tells the story and sets the mood—and meaningfully condensed into three lines in the haiku. The form seems simple—a short narrative, then three lines with a five-seven-five syllable pattern—which has lead many readers to regard it as a “children’s form”. It is this simplicity, however, that testifies to the brilliance of Basho. Such strict and simple parameters require precise and purposeful word choice—there is…
Read More

The Sweetest Poetry from the Land of the Free

Whitman in his preface explores America and its Poets. He showcases the USA as the greatest place in the world by showcasing its uniqueness compared to the rest of the world and that included showing how a poet should be. He gives a definition of what a poem is and how far its influence can reach.“A great poem is for ages and ages in common, and for all degrees and complexions, and all departments and sects, and for a woman as much as a man and a man as much as a woman”. In the following paragraph I will explain more on poetry and the uniqueness of the USA. To…
Read More

The Voices of the Voiceless: Comparing the Poetry of Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen

As two key figureheads in what is now deemed the Harlem Renaissance, Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen served as voices for a previously voiceless population. Their poetry speaks of the enduring struggles of being an African American, and the effort required to merely survive in such a discriminatory society. However, despite being poets with similar senses of purpose, their employed methods differed dramatically; Hughes and Cullen approach the field of poetry at two vastly different vantage points. While Hughes and Cullen differ in selections of speaker and audience, their core concepts of struggle, a faulty society, and a wise, complex narrator remain mutual. As blacks in 1920s America, Hughes and…
Read More

Memory and Retrospection in Duffy’s Poetry

In both “Before You Were Mine” and “Brothers,” Carol Ann Duffy uses descriptions of memory as a means of re-living past family life. Throughout “Before You Were Mine,” Duffy writes about her mother, and imagines her life before motherhood. This poem is designed as Duffy’s recollection of her mother through her mother’s own memories, and her recognition of all she was before the responsibilities and commitment on having children came into her life. Duffy seeks to reanimate and capture what her mother was like when she was younger, and does so by re-living her past through imaginings of what her mother’s memories might have been. We get the impression that…
Read More

How to Write About Poetry Essay

Poetry may be considered as a picture or chalk out done in words instead than in ink or colour. To compose about poesy we must hold an apprehension of what the poet is seeking to pass on. For this we need to put ourselves in the poets’ places and understands his sentiments and construe his looks accurately & A ; right. To get down composing about poesy we need to see approximately ten of import points. First. see the nature of the verse form i. e. the flow of ideas that form the verse form. The flow needs to be mentioned when the basic elements of the verse form are…
Read More

Study Of Poetry

An Essay Study of Poetry andA Poet’s Ability to ForseeThe FutureThe world is changing and evolving at an astounding rate. Within the lastone hundred years, the Western community has seen advances in technologyand medicine that has improved the lifestyles and longevity of almostevery individual. Within the last two hundred years, we have seen twoWorld Wars, and countless disputes over false borders created bycolonialists, slavery, and every horrid form of human sufferingimaginable! Human lifestyles and cultures are changing every minute. Whileour grandparents and ancestors were growing-up, do you think that theyever imagined the world we live in today? What is to come is almostinconceivable to us now. In this world, the…
Read More

Komunyakaa’s “Untitled Blues”: Confronting Racial Injustice Through Poetry

Although the majority of Yusef Komunyakaa’s poem “Untitled Blues” portrays descriptive and vivid scenes of music, dancing, and joy, these images are merely distractions from the deeper message that hides within the lines of the piece. Images of “tap dancers [who] hold / to the last steps” (32-33) as people who “jive / down on Bourbon & Conti” (31-32) and of “drunks discussing God / around a honky-tonk piano” (16-17), come together to act as a mask, behind which struggle, crises, and injustice hide. Komunyakaa highlights the reoccurring pattern throughout history, in which society hides from pressing issues, and instead, focuses on the bright side, making finding solutions nearly impossible.…
Read More

Modernism in the Poetry of T.S. Eliot and Christopher Okigbo

Christopher Okigbo’s poetry has often been compared to that of T. S. Eliot, partly because Okigbo uses Eliot’s signature linguistic devices such as exploiting metaphor to create a densely symbolic dimension to his poetry. In addition, he also appears at times to be consciously invoking comparisons with Eliot through such means as similarity of titles, as in the correspondence between his own Four Canzones and Eliot’s Four Quartets. Also like Eliot, Okigbo’s poetry forces a critical assessment that moves beyond the content of the works themselves to enlarge the discussion about broader topics such as the meaning of poetry and the purpose of the poet in modern society. Christopher Okigbo’s…
Read More

Understanding Poetry Essay

Teachers have been talking about the deficiency of critical stuff on some of the literature set pieces ( peculiarly the verse forms ) selected for survey at the Caribbean O’Level. Diverse readings make an geographic expedition of literary stuff interesting and expansive. This usher to the survey of ‘set’ poems is a response to those who wish to be expansive in their analysis and grasp. It is non intended to be a exemplary commentary but an analysis or reading that will excite farther treatment and analysis. Some verse forms are treated with inquiries. This attack helps to clarify the cardinal subjects or thoughts in the verse forms. This is a…
Read More

The Imagery of Landscape in the Poetry of the First World War: From Rupert Brooke to Edward Thomas

At the turn of the nineteenth century, and the start of the ‘War to end all Wars’, there was a rise in an exclusive kind of poetry, born in the suffering hands of the ‘War poet’. He is often seen in a state of despair, and combines the peaceful scenes of the preceding century with a sense of extreme pain and depression. It is the descriptions of landscape that this amalgamation is most clear, where the destruction of the peaceful and stable past is evident and where a new sense of misery is observed. The First World War had Britain ask itself if the country could ever return to its…
Read More

Vision through Voice: The Poetry of Basho in the English Language

In Narrow Road to the Deep North, Japanese poet Basho expresses himself masterfully through the traditional forms of haibun, covering themes of nature, folklore, faith, and journeys both physical and spiritual. All these stories and sentiments are contained within a haibun—a short piece of prose that tells the story and sets the mood—and meaningfully condensed into three lines in the haiku. The form seems simple—a short narrative, then three lines with a five-seven-five syllable pattern—which has lead many readers to regard it as a “children’s form”. It is this simplicity, however, that testifies to the brilliance of Basho. Such strict and simple parameters require precise and purposeful word choice—there is…
Read More

The Sweetest Poetry from the Land of the Free

Whitman in his preface explores America and its Poets. He showcases the USA as the greatest place in the world by showcasing its uniqueness compared to the rest of the world and that included showing how a poet should be. He gives a definition of what a poem is and how far its influence can reach.“A great poem is for ages and ages in common, and for all degrees and complexions, and all departments and sects, and for a woman as much as a man and a man as much as a woman”. In the following paragraph I will explain more on poetry and the uniqueness of the USA. To…
Read More

The Voices of the Voiceless: Comparing the Poetry of Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen

As two key figureheads in what is now deemed the Harlem Renaissance, Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen served as voices for a previously voiceless population. Their poetry speaks of the enduring struggles of being an African American, and the effort required to merely survive in such a discriminatory society. However, despite being poets with similar senses of purpose, their employed methods differed dramatically; Hughes and Cullen approach the field of poetry at two vastly different vantage points. While Hughes and Cullen differ in selections of speaker and audience, their core concepts of struggle, a faulty society, and a wise, complex narrator remain mutual. As blacks in 1920s America, Hughes and…
Read More

Memory and Retrospection in Duffy’s Poetry

In both “Before You Were Mine” and “Brothers,” Carol Ann Duffy uses descriptions of memory as a means of re-living past family life. Throughout “Before You Were Mine,” Duffy writes about her mother, and imagines her life before motherhood. This poem is designed as Duffy’s recollection of her mother through her mother’s own memories, and her recognition of all she was before the responsibilities and commitment on having children came into her life. Duffy seeks to reanimate and capture what her mother was like when she was younger, and does so by re-living her past through imaginings of what her mother’s memories might have been. We get the impression that…
Read More

How to Write About Poetry Essay

Poetry may be considered as a picture or chalk out done in words instead than in ink or colour. To compose about poesy we must hold an apprehension of what the poet is seeking to pass on. For this we need to put ourselves in the poets’ places and understands his sentiments and construe his looks accurately & A ; right. To get down composing about poesy we need to see approximately ten of import points. First. see the nature of the verse form i. e. the flow of ideas that form the verse form. The flow needs to be mentioned when the basic elements of the verse form are…
Read More

Study Of Poetry

An Essay Study of Poetry andA Poet’s Ability to ForseeThe FutureThe world is changing and evolving at an astounding rate. Within the lastone hundred years, the Western community has seen advances in technologyand medicine that has improved the lifestyles and longevity of almostevery individual. Within the last two hundred years, we have seen twoWorld Wars, and countless disputes over false borders created bycolonialists, slavery, and every horrid form of human sufferingimaginable! Human lifestyles and cultures are changing every minute. Whileour grandparents and ancestors were growing-up, do you think that theyever imagined the world we live in today? What is to come is almostinconceivable to us now. In this world, the…
Read More

Komunyakaa’s “Untitled Blues”: Confronting Racial Injustice Through Poetry

Although the majority of Yusef Komunyakaa’s poem “Untitled Blues” portrays descriptive and vivid scenes of music, dancing, and joy, these images are merely distractions from the deeper message that hides within the lines of the piece. Images of “tap dancers [who] hold / to the last steps” (32-33) as people who “jive / down on Bourbon & Conti” (31-32) and of “drunks discussing God / around a honky-tonk piano” (16-17), come together to act as a mask, behind which struggle, crises, and injustice hide. Komunyakaa highlights the reoccurring pattern throughout history, in which society hides from pressing issues, and instead, focuses on the bright side, making finding solutions nearly impossible.…
Read More

Modernism in the Poetry of T.S. Eliot and Christopher Okigbo

Christopher Okigbo’s poetry has often been compared to that of T. S. Eliot, partly because Okigbo uses Eliot’s signature linguistic devices such as exploiting metaphor to create a densely symbolic dimension to his poetry. In addition, he also appears at times to be consciously invoking comparisons with Eliot through such means as similarity of titles, as in the correspondence between his own Four Canzones and Eliot’s Four Quartets. Also like Eliot, Okigbo’s poetry forces a critical assessment that moves beyond the content of the works themselves to enlarge the discussion about broader topics such as the meaning of poetry and the purpose of the poet in modern society. Christopher Okigbo’s…
Read More

Understanding Poetry Essay

Teachers have been talking about the deficiency of critical stuff on some of the literature set pieces ( peculiarly the verse forms ) selected for survey at the Caribbean O’Level. Diverse readings make an geographic expedition of literary stuff interesting and expansive. This usher to the survey of ‘set’ poems is a response to those who wish to be expansive in their analysis and grasp. It is non intended to be a exemplary commentary but an analysis or reading that will excite farther treatment and analysis. Some verse forms are treated with inquiries. This attack helps to clarify the cardinal subjects or thoughts in the verse forms. This is a…
Read More

The Imagery of Landscape in the Poetry of the First World War: From Rupert Brooke to Edward Thomas

At the turn of the nineteenth century, and the start of the ‘War to end all Wars’, there was a rise in an exclusive kind of poetry, born in the suffering hands of the ‘War poet’. He is often seen in a state of despair, and combines the peaceful scenes of the preceding century with a sense of extreme pain and depression. It is the descriptions of landscape that this amalgamation is most clear, where the destruction of the peaceful and stable past is evident and where a new sense of misery is observed. The First World War had Britain ask itself if the country could ever return to its…
Read More

Vision through Voice: The Poetry of Basho in the English Language

In Narrow Road to the Deep North, Japanese poet Basho expresses himself masterfully through the traditional forms of haibun, covering themes of nature, folklore, faith, and journeys both physical and spiritual. All these stories and sentiments are contained within a haibun—a short piece of prose that tells the story and sets the mood—and meaningfully condensed into three lines in the haiku. The form seems simple—a short narrative, then three lines with a five-seven-five syllable pattern—which has lead many readers to regard it as a “children’s form”. It is this simplicity, however, that testifies to the brilliance of Basho. Such strict and simple parameters require precise and purposeful word choice—there is…
Read More

The Sweetest Poetry from the Land of the Free

Whitman in his preface explores America and its Poets. He showcases the USA as the greatest place in the world by showcasing its uniqueness compared to the rest of the world and that included showing how a poet should be. He gives a definition of what a poem is and how far its influence can reach.“A great poem is for ages and ages in common, and for all degrees and complexions, and all departments and sects, and for a woman as much as a man and a man as much as a woman”. In the following paragraph I will explain more on poetry and the uniqueness of the USA. To…
Read More

The Voices of the Voiceless: Comparing the Poetry of Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen

As two key figureheads in what is now deemed the Harlem Renaissance, Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen served as voices for a previously voiceless population. Their poetry speaks of the enduring struggles of being an African American, and the effort required to merely survive in such a discriminatory society. However, despite being poets with similar senses of purpose, their employed methods differed dramatically; Hughes and Cullen approach the field of poetry at two vastly different vantage points. While Hughes and Cullen differ in selections of speaker and audience, their core concepts of struggle, a faulty society, and a wise, complex narrator remain mutual. As blacks in 1920s America, Hughes and…
Read More

Memory and Retrospection in Duffy’s Poetry

In both “Before You Were Mine” and “Brothers,” Carol Ann Duffy uses descriptions of memory as a means of re-living past family life. Throughout “Before You Were Mine,” Duffy writes about her mother, and imagines her life before motherhood. This poem is designed as Duffy’s recollection of her mother through her mother’s own memories, and her recognition of all she was before the responsibilities and commitment on having children came into her life. Duffy seeks to reanimate and capture what her mother was like when she was younger, and does so by re-living her past through imaginings of what her mother’s memories might have been. We get the impression that…
Read More

How to Write About Poetry Essay

Poetry may be considered as a picture or chalk out done in words instead than in ink or colour. To compose about poesy we must hold an apprehension of what the poet is seeking to pass on. For this we need to put ourselves in the poets’ places and understands his sentiments and construe his looks accurately & A ; right. To get down composing about poesy we need to see approximately ten of import points. First. see the nature of the verse form i. e. the flow of ideas that form the verse form. The flow needs to be mentioned when the basic elements of the verse form are…
Read More

Study Of Poetry

An Essay Study of Poetry andA Poet’s Ability to ForseeThe FutureThe world is changing and evolving at an astounding rate. Within the lastone hundred years, the Western community has seen advances in technologyand medicine that has improved the lifestyles and longevity of almostevery individual. Within the last two hundred years, we have seen twoWorld Wars, and countless disputes over false borders created bycolonialists, slavery, and every horrid form of human sufferingimaginable! Human lifestyles and cultures are changing every minute. Whileour grandparents and ancestors were growing-up, do you think that theyever imagined the world we live in today? What is to come is almostinconceivable to us now. In this world, the…
Read More

Komunyakaa’s “Untitled Blues”: Confronting Racial Injustice Through Poetry

Although the majority of Yusef Komunyakaa’s poem “Untitled Blues” portrays descriptive and vivid scenes of music, dancing, and joy, these images are merely distractions from the deeper message that hides within the lines of the piece. Images of “tap dancers [who] hold / to the last steps” (32-33) as people who “jive / down on Bourbon & Conti” (31-32) and of “drunks discussing God / around a honky-tonk piano” (16-17), come together to act as a mask, behind which struggle, crises, and injustice hide. Komunyakaa highlights the reoccurring pattern throughout history, in which society hides from pressing issues, and instead, focuses on the bright side, making finding solutions nearly impossible.…
Read More

Modernism in the Poetry of T.S. Eliot and Christopher Okigbo

Christopher Okigbo’s poetry has often been compared to that of T. S. Eliot, partly because Okigbo uses Eliot’s signature linguistic devices such as exploiting metaphor to create a densely symbolic dimension to his poetry. In addition, he also appears at times to be consciously invoking comparisons with Eliot through such means as similarity of titles, as in the correspondence between his own Four Canzones and Eliot’s Four Quartets. Also like Eliot, Okigbo’s poetry forces a critical assessment that moves beyond the content of the works themselves to enlarge the discussion about broader topics such as the meaning of poetry and the purpose of the poet in modern society. Christopher Okigbo’s…
Read More

Understanding Poetry Essay

Teachers have been talking about the deficiency of critical stuff on some of the literature set pieces ( peculiarly the verse forms ) selected for survey at the Caribbean O’Level. Diverse readings make an geographic expedition of literary stuff interesting and expansive. This usher to the survey of ‘set’ poems is a response to those who wish to be expansive in their analysis and grasp. It is non intended to be a exemplary commentary but an analysis or reading that will excite farther treatment and analysis. Some verse forms are treated with inquiries. This attack helps to clarify the cardinal subjects or thoughts in the verse forms. This is a…
Read More

The Imagery of Landscape in the Poetry of the First World War: From Rupert Brooke to Edward Thomas

At the turn of the nineteenth century, and the start of the ‘War to end all Wars’, there was a rise in an exclusive kind of poetry, born in the suffering hands of the ‘War poet’. He is often seen in a state of despair, and combines the peaceful scenes of the preceding century with a sense of extreme pain and depression. It is the descriptions of landscape that this amalgamation is most clear, where the destruction of the peaceful and stable past is evident and where a new sense of misery is observed. The First World War had Britain ask itself if the country could ever return to its…
Read More

Vision through Voice: The Poetry of Basho in the English Language

In Narrow Road to the Deep North, Japanese poet Basho expresses himself masterfully through the traditional forms of haibun, covering themes of nature, folklore, faith, and journeys both physical and spiritual. All these stories and sentiments are contained within a haibun—a short piece of prose that tells the story and sets the mood—and meaningfully condensed into three lines in the haiku. The form seems simple—a short narrative, then three lines with a five-seven-five syllable pattern—which has lead many readers to regard it as a “children’s form”. It is this simplicity, however, that testifies to the brilliance of Basho. Such strict and simple parameters require precise and purposeful word choice—there is…
Read More

The Sweetest Poetry from the Land of the Free

Whitman in his preface explores America and its Poets. He showcases the USA as the greatest place in the world by showcasing its uniqueness compared to the rest of the world and that included showing how a poet should be. He gives a definition of what a poem is and how far its influence can reach.“A great poem is for ages and ages in common, and for all degrees and complexions, and all departments and sects, and for a woman as much as a man and a man as much as a woman”. In the following paragraph I will explain more on poetry and the uniqueness of the USA. To…
Read More

The Voices of the Voiceless: Comparing the Poetry of Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen

As two key figureheads in what is now deemed the Harlem Renaissance, Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen served as voices for a previously voiceless population. Their poetry speaks of the enduring struggles of being an African American, and the effort required to merely survive in such a discriminatory society. However, despite being poets with similar senses of purpose, their employed methods differed dramatically; Hughes and Cullen approach the field of poetry at two vastly different vantage points. While Hughes and Cullen differ in selections of speaker and audience, their core concepts of struggle, a faulty society, and a wise, complex narrator remain mutual. As blacks in 1920s America, Hughes and…
Read More

Memory and Retrospection in Duffy’s Poetry

In both “Before You Were Mine” and “Brothers,” Carol Ann Duffy uses descriptions of memory as a means of re-living past family life. Throughout “Before You Were Mine,” Duffy writes about her mother, and imagines her life before motherhood. This poem is designed as Duffy’s recollection of her mother through her mother’s own memories, and her recognition of all she was before the responsibilities and commitment on having children came into her life. Duffy seeks to reanimate and capture what her mother was like when she was younger, and does so by re-living her past through imaginings of what her mother’s memories might have been. We get the impression that…
Read More

How to Write About Poetry Essay

Poetry may be considered as a picture or chalk out done in words instead than in ink or colour. To compose about poesy we must hold an apprehension of what the poet is seeking to pass on. For this we need to put ourselves in the poets’ places and understands his sentiments and construe his looks accurately & A ; right. To get down composing about poesy we need to see approximately ten of import points. First. see the nature of the verse form i. e. the flow of ideas that form the verse form. The flow needs to be mentioned when the basic elements of the verse form are…
Read More

Study Of Poetry

An Essay Study of Poetry andA Poet’s Ability to ForseeThe FutureThe world is changing and evolving at an astounding rate. Within the lastone hundred years, the Western community has seen advances in technologyand medicine that has improved the lifestyles and longevity of almostevery individual. Within the last two hundred years, we have seen twoWorld Wars, and countless disputes over false borders created bycolonialists, slavery, and every horrid form of human sufferingimaginable! Human lifestyles and cultures are changing every minute. Whileour grandparents and ancestors were growing-up, do you think that theyever imagined the world we live in today? What is to come is almostinconceivable to us now. In this world, the…
Read More

Komunyakaa’s “Untitled Blues”: Confronting Racial Injustice Through Poetry

Although the majority of Yusef Komunyakaa’s poem “Untitled Blues” portrays descriptive and vivid scenes of music, dancing, and joy, these images are merely distractions from the deeper message that hides within the lines of the piece. Images of “tap dancers [who] hold / to the last steps” (32-33) as people who “jive / down on Bourbon & Conti” (31-32) and of “drunks discussing God / around a honky-tonk piano” (16-17), come together to act as a mask, behind which struggle, crises, and injustice hide. Komunyakaa highlights the reoccurring pattern throughout history, in which society hides from pressing issues, and instead, focuses on the bright side, making finding solutions nearly impossible.…
Read More

Modernism in the Poetry of T.S. Eliot and Christopher Okigbo

Christopher Okigbo’s poetry has often been compared to that of T. S. Eliot, partly because Okigbo uses Eliot’s signature linguistic devices such as exploiting metaphor to create a densely symbolic dimension to his poetry. In addition, he also appears at times to be consciously invoking comparisons with Eliot through such means as similarity of titles, as in the correspondence between his own Four Canzones and Eliot’s Four Quartets. Also like Eliot, Okigbo’s poetry forces a critical assessment that moves beyond the content of the works themselves to enlarge the discussion about broader topics such as the meaning of poetry and the purpose of the poet in modern society. Christopher Okigbo’s…
Read More

Understanding Poetry Essay

Teachers have been talking about the deficiency of critical stuff on some of the literature set pieces ( peculiarly the verse forms ) selected for survey at the Caribbean O’Level. Diverse readings make an geographic expedition of literary stuff interesting and expansive. This usher to the survey of ‘set’ poems is a response to those who wish to be expansive in their analysis and grasp. It is non intended to be a exemplary commentary but an analysis or reading that will excite farther treatment and analysis. Some verse forms are treated with inquiries. This attack helps to clarify the cardinal subjects or thoughts in the verse forms. This is a…
Read More

The Imagery of Landscape in the Poetry of the First World War: From Rupert Brooke to Edward Thomas

At the turn of the nineteenth century, and the start of the ‘War to end all Wars’, there was a rise in an exclusive kind of poetry, born in the suffering hands of the ‘War poet’. He is often seen in a state of despair, and combines the peaceful scenes of the preceding century with a sense of extreme pain and depression. It is the descriptions of landscape that this amalgamation is most clear, where the destruction of the peaceful and stable past is evident and where a new sense of misery is observed. The First World War had Britain ask itself if the country could ever return to its…
Read More

Vision through Voice: The Poetry of Basho in the English Language

In Narrow Road to the Deep North, Japanese poet Basho expresses himself masterfully through the traditional forms of haibun, covering themes of nature, folklore, faith, and journeys both physical and spiritual. All these stories and sentiments are contained within a haibun—a short piece of prose that tells the story and sets the mood—and meaningfully condensed into three lines in the haiku. The form seems simple—a short narrative, then three lines with a five-seven-five syllable pattern—which has lead many readers to regard it as a “children’s form”. It is this simplicity, however, that testifies to the brilliance of Basho. Such strict and simple parameters require precise and purposeful word choice—there is…
Read More

The Sweetest Poetry from the Land of the Free

Whitman in his preface explores America and its Poets. He showcases the USA as the greatest place in the world by showcasing its uniqueness compared to the rest of the world and that included showing how a poet should be. He gives a definition of what a poem is and how far its influence can reach.“A great poem is for ages and ages in common, and for all degrees and complexions, and all departments and sects, and for a woman as much as a man and a man as much as a woman”. In the following paragraph I will explain more on poetry and the uniqueness of the USA. To…
Read More

The Voices of the Voiceless: Comparing the Poetry of Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen

As two key figureheads in what is now deemed the Harlem Renaissance, Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen served as voices for a previously voiceless population. Their poetry speaks of the enduring struggles of being an African American, and the effort required to merely survive in such a discriminatory society. However, despite being poets with similar senses of purpose, their employed methods differed dramatically; Hughes and Cullen approach the field of poetry at two vastly different vantage points. While Hughes and Cullen differ in selections of speaker and audience, their core concepts of struggle, a faulty society, and a wise, complex narrator remain mutual. As blacks in 1920s America, Hughes and…
Read More

Memory and Retrospection in Duffy’s Poetry

In both “Before You Were Mine” and “Brothers,” Carol Ann Duffy uses descriptions of memory as a means of re-living past family life. Throughout “Before You Were Mine,” Duffy writes about her mother, and imagines her life before motherhood. This poem is designed as Duffy’s recollection of her mother through her mother’s own memories, and her recognition of all she was before the responsibilities and commitment on having children came into her life. Duffy seeks to reanimate and capture what her mother was like when she was younger, and does so by re-living her past through imaginings of what her mother’s memories might have been. We get the impression that…
Read More

How to Write About Poetry Essay

Poetry may be considered as a picture or chalk out done in words instead than in ink or colour. To compose about poesy we must hold an apprehension of what the poet is seeking to pass on. For this we need to put ourselves in the poets’ places and understands his sentiments and construe his looks accurately & A ; right. To get down composing about poesy we need to see approximately ten of import points. First. see the nature of the verse form i. e. the flow of ideas that form the verse form. The flow needs to be mentioned when the basic elements of the verse form are…
Read More

Study Of Poetry

An Essay Study of Poetry andA Poet’s Ability to ForseeThe FutureThe world is changing and evolving at an astounding rate. Within the lastone hundred years, the Western community has seen advances in technologyand medicine that has improved the lifestyles and longevity of almostevery individual. Within the last two hundred years, we have seen twoWorld Wars, and countless disputes over false borders created bycolonialists, slavery, and every horrid form of human sufferingimaginable! Human lifestyles and cultures are changing every minute. Whileour grandparents and ancestors were growing-up, do you think that theyever imagined the world we live in today? What is to come is almostinconceivable to us now. In this world, the…
Read More

Komunyakaa’s “Untitled Blues”: Confronting Racial Injustice Through Poetry

Although the majority of Yusef Komunyakaa’s poem “Untitled Blues” portrays descriptive and vivid scenes of music, dancing, and joy, these images are merely distractions from the deeper message that hides within the lines of the piece. Images of “tap dancers [who] hold / to the last steps” (32-33) as people who “jive / down on Bourbon & Conti” (31-32) and of “drunks discussing God / around a honky-tonk piano” (16-17), come together to act as a mask, behind which struggle, crises, and injustice hide. Komunyakaa highlights the reoccurring pattern throughout history, in which society hides from pressing issues, and instead, focuses on the bright side, making finding solutions nearly impossible.…
Read More

Modernism in the Poetry of T.S. Eliot and Christopher Okigbo

Christopher Okigbo’s poetry has often been compared to that of T. S. Eliot, partly because Okigbo uses Eliot’s signature linguistic devices such as exploiting metaphor to create a densely symbolic dimension to his poetry. In addition, he also appears at times to be consciously invoking comparisons with Eliot through such means as similarity of titles, as in the correspondence between his own Four Canzones and Eliot’s Four Quartets. Also like Eliot, Okigbo’s poetry forces a critical assessment that moves beyond the content of the works themselves to enlarge the discussion about broader topics such as the meaning of poetry and the purpose of the poet in modern society. Christopher Okigbo’s…
Read More

Understanding Poetry Essay

Teachers have been talking about the deficiency of critical stuff on some of the literature set pieces ( peculiarly the verse forms ) selected for survey at the Caribbean O’Level. Diverse readings make an geographic expedition of literary stuff interesting and expansive. This usher to the survey of ‘set’ poems is a response to those who wish to be expansive in their analysis and grasp. It is non intended to be a exemplary commentary but an analysis or reading that will excite farther treatment and analysis. Some verse forms are treated with inquiries. This attack helps to clarify the cardinal subjects or thoughts in the verse forms. This is a…
Read More

The Imagery of Landscape in the Poetry of the First World War: From Rupert Brooke to Edward Thomas

At the turn of the nineteenth century, and the start of the ‘War to end all Wars’, there was a rise in an exclusive kind of poetry, born in the suffering hands of the ‘War poet’. He is often seen in a state of despair, and combines the peaceful scenes of the preceding century with a sense of extreme pain and depression. It is the descriptions of landscape that this amalgamation is most clear, where the destruction of the peaceful and stable past is evident and where a new sense of misery is observed. The First World War had Britain ask itself if the country could ever return to its…
Read More

Vision through Voice: The Poetry of Basho in the English Language

In Narrow Road to the Deep North, Japanese poet Basho expresses himself masterfully through the traditional forms of haibun, covering themes of nature, folklore, faith, and journeys both physical and spiritual. All these stories and sentiments are contained within a haibun—a short piece of prose that tells the story and sets the mood—and meaningfully condensed into three lines in the haiku. The form seems simple—a short narrative, then three lines with a five-seven-five syllable pattern—which has lead many readers to regard it as a “children’s form”. It is this simplicity, however, that testifies to the brilliance of Basho. Such strict and simple parameters require precise and purposeful word choice—there is…
Read More

The Sweetest Poetry from the Land of the Free

Whitman in his preface explores America and its Poets. He showcases the USA as the greatest place in the world by showcasing its uniqueness compared to the rest of the world and that included showing how a poet should be. He gives a definition of what a poem is and how far its influence can reach.“A great poem is for ages and ages in common, and for all degrees and complexions, and all departments and sects, and for a woman as much as a man and a man as much as a woman”. In the following paragraph I will explain more on poetry and the uniqueness of the USA. To…
Read More

The Voices of the Voiceless: Comparing the Poetry of Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen

As two key figureheads in what is now deemed the Harlem Renaissance, Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen served as voices for a previously voiceless population. Their poetry speaks of the enduring struggles of being an African American, and the effort required to merely survive in such a discriminatory society. However, despite being poets with similar senses of purpose, their employed methods differed dramatically; Hughes and Cullen approach the field of poetry at two vastly different vantage points. While Hughes and Cullen differ in selections of speaker and audience, their core concepts of struggle, a faulty society, and a wise, complex narrator remain mutual. As blacks in 1920s America, Hughes and…
Read More

Memory and Retrospection in Duffy’s Poetry

In both “Before You Were Mine” and “Brothers,” Carol Ann Duffy uses descriptions of memory as a means of re-living past family life. Throughout “Before You Were Mine,” Duffy writes about her mother, and imagines her life before motherhood. This poem is designed as Duffy’s recollection of her mother through her mother’s own memories, and her recognition of all she was before the responsibilities and commitment on having children came into her life. Duffy seeks to reanimate and capture what her mother was like when she was younger, and does so by re-living her past through imaginings of what her mother’s memories might have been. We get the impression that…
Read More

How to Write About Poetry Essay

Poetry may be considered as a picture or chalk out done in words instead than in ink or colour. To compose about poesy we must hold an apprehension of what the poet is seeking to pass on. For this we need to put ourselves in the poets’ places and understands his sentiments and construe his looks accurately & A ; right. To get down composing about poesy we need to see approximately ten of import points. First. see the nature of the verse form i. e. the flow of ideas that form the verse form. The flow needs to be mentioned when the basic elements of the verse form are…
Read More

Study Of Poetry

An Essay Study of Poetry andA Poet’s Ability to ForseeThe FutureThe world is changing and evolving at an astounding rate. Within the lastone hundred years, the Western community has seen advances in technologyand medicine that has improved the lifestyles and longevity of almostevery individual. Within the last two hundred years, we have seen twoWorld Wars, and countless disputes over false borders created bycolonialists, slavery, and every horrid form of human sufferingimaginable! Human lifestyles and cultures are changing every minute. Whileour grandparents and ancestors were growing-up, do you think that theyever imagined the world we live in today? What is to come is almostinconceivable to us now. In this world, the…
Read More

Komunyakaa’s “Untitled Blues”: Confronting Racial Injustice Through Poetry

Although the majority of Yusef Komunyakaa’s poem “Untitled Blues” portrays descriptive and vivid scenes of music, dancing, and joy, these images are merely distractions from the deeper message that hides within the lines of the piece. Images of “tap dancers [who] hold / to the last steps” (32-33) as people who “jive / down on Bourbon & Conti” (31-32) and of “drunks discussing God / around a honky-tonk piano” (16-17), come together to act as a mask, behind which struggle, crises, and injustice hide. Komunyakaa highlights the reoccurring pattern throughout history, in which society hides from pressing issues, and instead, focuses on the bright side, making finding solutions nearly impossible.…
Read More

Modernism in the Poetry of T.S. Eliot and Christopher Okigbo

Christopher Okigbo’s poetry has often been compared to that of T. S. Eliot, partly because Okigbo uses Eliot’s signature linguistic devices such as exploiting metaphor to create a densely symbolic dimension to his poetry. In addition, he also appears at times to be consciously invoking comparisons with Eliot through such means as similarity of titles, as in the correspondence between his own Four Canzones and Eliot’s Four Quartets. Also like Eliot, Okigbo’s poetry forces a critical assessment that moves beyond the content of the works themselves to enlarge the discussion about broader topics such as the meaning of poetry and the purpose of the poet in modern society. Christopher Okigbo’s…
Read More

Understanding Poetry Essay

Teachers have been talking about the deficiency of critical stuff on some of the literature set pieces ( peculiarly the verse forms ) selected for survey at the Caribbean O’Level. Diverse readings make an geographic expedition of literary stuff interesting and expansive. This usher to the survey of ‘set’ poems is a response to those who wish to be expansive in their analysis and grasp. It is non intended to be a exemplary commentary but an analysis or reading that will excite farther treatment and analysis. Some verse forms are treated with inquiries. This attack helps to clarify the cardinal subjects or thoughts in the verse forms. This is a…
Read More

The Imagery of Landscape in the Poetry of the First World War: From Rupert Brooke to Edward Thomas

At the turn of the nineteenth century, and the start of the ‘War to end all Wars’, there was a rise in an exclusive kind of poetry, born in the suffering hands of the ‘War poet’. He is often seen in a state of despair, and combines the peaceful scenes of the preceding century with a sense of extreme pain and depression. It is the descriptions of landscape that this amalgamation is most clear, where the destruction of the peaceful and stable past is evident and where a new sense of misery is observed. The First World War had Britain ask itself if the country could ever return to its…
Read More

Vision through Voice: The Poetry of Basho in the English Language

In Narrow Road to the Deep North, Japanese poet Basho expresses himself masterfully through the traditional forms of haibun, covering themes of nature, folklore, faith, and journeys both physical and spiritual. All these stories and sentiments are contained within a haibun—a short piece of prose that tells the story and sets the mood—and meaningfully condensed into three lines in the haiku. The form seems simple—a short narrative, then three lines with a five-seven-five syllable pattern—which has lead many readers to regard it as a “children’s form”. It is this simplicity, however, that testifies to the brilliance of Basho. Such strict and simple parameters require precise and purposeful word choice—there is…
Read More

The Sweetest Poetry from the Land of the Free

Whitman in his preface explores America and its Poets. He showcases the USA as the greatest place in the world by showcasing its uniqueness compared to the rest of the world and that included showing how a poet should be. He gives a definition of what a poem is and how far its influence can reach.“A great poem is for ages and ages in common, and for all degrees and complexions, and all departments and sects, and for a woman as much as a man and a man as much as a woman”. In the following paragraph I will explain more on poetry and the uniqueness of the USA. To…
Read More

The Voices of the Voiceless: Comparing the Poetry of Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen

As two key figureheads in what is now deemed the Harlem Renaissance, Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen served as voices for a previously voiceless population. Their poetry speaks of the enduring struggles of being an African American, and the effort required to merely survive in such a discriminatory society. However, despite being poets with similar senses of purpose, their employed methods differed dramatically; Hughes and Cullen approach the field of poetry at two vastly different vantage points. While Hughes and Cullen differ in selections of speaker and audience, their core concepts of struggle, a faulty society, and a wise, complex narrator remain mutual. As blacks in 1920s America, Hughes and…
Read More

Memory and Retrospection in Duffy’s Poetry

In both “Before You Were Mine” and “Brothers,” Carol Ann Duffy uses descriptions of memory as a means of re-living past family life. Throughout “Before You Were Mine,” Duffy writes about her mother, and imagines her life before motherhood. This poem is designed as Duffy’s recollection of her mother through her mother’s own memories, and her recognition of all she was before the responsibilities and commitment on having children came into her life. Duffy seeks to reanimate and capture what her mother was like when she was younger, and does so by re-living her past through imaginings of what her mother’s memories might have been. We get the impression that…
Read More

How to Write About Poetry Essay

Poetry may be considered as a picture or chalk out done in words instead than in ink or colour. To compose about poesy we must hold an apprehension of what the poet is seeking to pass on. For this we need to put ourselves in the poets’ places and understands his sentiments and construe his looks accurately & A ; right. To get down composing about poesy we need to see approximately ten of import points. First. see the nature of the verse form i. e. the flow of ideas that form the verse form. The flow needs to be mentioned when the basic elements of the verse form are…
Read More

Study Of Poetry

An Essay Study of Poetry andA Poet’s Ability to ForseeThe FutureThe world is changing and evolving at an astounding rate. Within the lastone hundred years, the Western community has seen advances in technologyand medicine that has improved the lifestyles and longevity of almostevery individual. Within the last two hundred years, we have seen twoWorld Wars, and countless disputes over false borders created bycolonialists, slavery, and every horrid form of human sufferingimaginable! Human lifestyles and cultures are changing every minute. Whileour grandparents and ancestors were growing-up, do you think that theyever imagined the world we live in today? What is to come is almostinconceivable to us now. In this world, the…
Read More

Komunyakaa’s “Untitled Blues”: Confronting Racial Injustice Through Poetry

Although the majority of Yusef Komunyakaa’s poem “Untitled Blues” portrays descriptive and vivid scenes of music, dancing, and joy, these images are merely distractions from the deeper message that hides within the lines of the piece. Images of “tap dancers [who] hold / to the last steps” (32-33) as people who “jive / down on Bourbon & Conti” (31-32) and of “drunks discussing God / around a honky-tonk piano” (16-17), come together to act as a mask, behind which struggle, crises, and injustice hide. Komunyakaa highlights the reoccurring pattern throughout history, in which society hides from pressing issues, and instead, focuses on the bright side, making finding solutions nearly impossible.…
Read More

Modernism in the Poetry of T.S. Eliot and Christopher Okigbo

Christopher Okigbo’s poetry has often been compared to that of T. S. Eliot, partly because Okigbo uses Eliot’s signature linguistic devices such as exploiting metaphor to create a densely symbolic dimension to his poetry. In addition, he also appears at times to be consciously invoking comparisons with Eliot through such means as similarity of titles, as in the correspondence between his own Four Canzones and Eliot’s Four Quartets. Also like Eliot, Okigbo’s poetry forces a critical assessment that moves beyond the content of the works themselves to enlarge the discussion about broader topics such as the meaning of poetry and the purpose of the poet in modern society. Christopher Okigbo’s…
Read More

Understanding Poetry Essay

Teachers have been talking about the deficiency of critical stuff on some of the literature set pieces ( peculiarly the verse forms ) selected for survey at the Caribbean O’Level. Diverse readings make an geographic expedition of literary stuff interesting and expansive. This usher to the survey of ‘set’ poems is a response to those who wish to be expansive in their analysis and grasp. It is non intended to be a exemplary commentary but an analysis or reading that will excite farther treatment and analysis. Some verse forms are treated with inquiries. This attack helps to clarify the cardinal subjects or thoughts in the verse forms. This is a…
Read More

The Imagery of Landscape in the Poetry of the First World War: From Rupert Brooke to Edward Thomas

At the turn of the nineteenth century, and the start of the ‘War to end all Wars’, there was a rise in an exclusive kind of poetry, born in the suffering hands of the ‘War poet’. He is often seen in a state of despair, and combines the peaceful scenes of the preceding century with a sense of extreme pain and depression. It is the descriptions of landscape that this amalgamation is most clear, where the destruction of the peaceful and stable past is evident and where a new sense of misery is observed. The First World War had Britain ask itself if the country could ever return to its…
Read More

Vision through Voice: The Poetry of Basho in the English Language

In Narrow Road to the Deep North, Japanese poet Basho expresses himself masterfully through the traditional forms of haibun, covering themes of nature, folklore, faith, and journeys both physical and spiritual. All these stories and sentiments are contained within a haibun—a short piece of prose that tells the story and sets the mood—and meaningfully condensed into three lines in the haiku. The form seems simple—a short narrative, then three lines with a five-seven-five syllable pattern—which has lead many readers to regard it as a “children’s form”. It is this simplicity, however, that testifies to the brilliance of Basho. Such strict and simple parameters require precise and purposeful word choice—there is…
Read More

The Sweetest Poetry from the Land of the Free

Whitman in his preface explores America and its Poets. He showcases the USA as the greatest place in the world by showcasing its uniqueness compared to the rest of the world and that included showing how a poet should be. He gives a definition of what a poem is and how far its influence can reach.“A great poem is for ages and ages in common, and for all degrees and complexions, and all departments and sects, and for a woman as much as a man and a man as much as a woman”. In the following paragraph I will explain more on poetry and the uniqueness of the USA. To…
Read More

The Voices of the Voiceless: Comparing the Poetry of Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen

As two key figureheads in what is now deemed the Harlem Renaissance, Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen served as voices for a previously voiceless population. Their poetry speaks of the enduring struggles of being an African American, and the effort required to merely survive in such a discriminatory society. However, despite being poets with similar senses of purpose, their employed methods differed dramatically; Hughes and Cullen approach the field of poetry at two vastly different vantage points. While Hughes and Cullen differ in selections of speaker and audience, their core concepts of struggle, a faulty society, and a wise, complex narrator remain mutual. As blacks in 1920s America, Hughes and…
Read More

Memory and Retrospection in Duffy’s Poetry

In both “Before You Were Mine” and “Brothers,” Carol Ann Duffy uses descriptions of memory as a means of re-living past family life. Throughout “Before You Were Mine,” Duffy writes about her mother, and imagines her life before motherhood. This poem is designed as Duffy’s recollection of her mother through her mother’s own memories, and her recognition of all she was before the responsibilities and commitment on having children came into her life. Duffy seeks to reanimate and capture what her mother was like when she was younger, and does so by re-living her past through imaginings of what her mother’s memories might have been. We get the impression that…
Read More

How to Write About Poetry Essay

Poetry may be considered as a picture or chalk out done in words instead than in ink or colour. To compose about poesy we must hold an apprehension of what the poet is seeking to pass on. For this we need to put ourselves in the poets’ places and understands his sentiments and construe his looks accurately & A ; right. To get down composing about poesy we need to see approximately ten of import points. First. see the nature of the verse form i. e. the flow of ideas that form the verse form. The flow needs to be mentioned when the basic elements of the verse form are…
Read More

Study Of Poetry

An Essay Study of Poetry andA Poet’s Ability to ForseeThe FutureThe world is changing and evolving at an astounding rate. Within the lastone hundred years, the Western community has seen advances in technologyand medicine that has improved the lifestyles and longevity of almostevery individual. Within the last two hundred years, we have seen twoWorld Wars, and countless disputes over false borders created bycolonialists, slavery, and every horrid form of human sufferingimaginable! Human lifestyles and cultures are changing every minute. Whileour grandparents and ancestors were growing-up, do you think that theyever imagined the world we live in today? What is to come is almostinconceivable to us now. In this world, the…
Read More

Komunyakaa’s “Untitled Blues”: Confronting Racial Injustice Through Poetry

Although the majority of Yusef Komunyakaa’s poem “Untitled Blues” portrays descriptive and vivid scenes of music, dancing, and joy, these images are merely distractions from the deeper message that hides within the lines of the piece. Images of “tap dancers [who] hold / to the last steps” (32-33) as people who “jive / down on Bourbon & Conti” (31-32) and of “drunks discussing God / around a honky-tonk piano” (16-17), come together to act as a mask, behind which struggle, crises, and injustice hide. Komunyakaa highlights the reoccurring pattern throughout history, in which society hides from pressing issues, and instead, focuses on the bright side, making finding solutions nearly impossible.…
Read More

Modernism in the Poetry of T.S. Eliot and Christopher Okigbo

Christopher Okigbo’s poetry has often been compared to that of T. S. Eliot, partly because Okigbo uses Eliot’s signature linguistic devices such as exploiting metaphor to create a densely symbolic dimension to his poetry. In addition, he also appears at times to be consciously invoking comparisons with Eliot through such means as similarity of titles, as in the correspondence between his own Four Canzones and Eliot’s Four Quartets. Also like Eliot, Okigbo’s poetry forces a critical assessment that moves beyond the content of the works themselves to enlarge the discussion about broader topics such as the meaning of poetry and the purpose of the poet in modern society. Christopher Okigbo’s…
Read More

Understanding Poetry Essay

Teachers have been talking about the deficiency of critical stuff on some of the literature set pieces ( peculiarly the verse forms ) selected for survey at the Caribbean O’Level. Diverse readings make an geographic expedition of literary stuff interesting and expansive. This usher to the survey of ‘set’ poems is a response to those who wish to be expansive in their analysis and grasp. It is non intended to be a exemplary commentary but an analysis or reading that will excite farther treatment and analysis. Some verse forms are treated with inquiries. This attack helps to clarify the cardinal subjects or thoughts in the verse forms. This is a…
Read More

The Imagery of Landscape in the Poetry of the First World War: From Rupert Brooke to Edward Thomas

At the turn of the nineteenth century, and the start of the ‘War to end all Wars’, there was a rise in an exclusive kind of poetry, born in the suffering hands of the ‘War poet’. He is often seen in a state of despair, and combines the peaceful scenes of the preceding century with a sense of extreme pain and depression. It is the descriptions of landscape that this amalgamation is most clear, where the destruction of the peaceful and stable past is evident and where a new sense of misery is observed. The First World War had Britain ask itself if the country could ever return to its…
Read More

Vision through Voice: The Poetry of Basho in the English Language

In Narrow Road to the Deep North, Japanese poet Basho expresses himself masterfully through the traditional forms of haibun, covering themes of nature, folklore, faith, and journeys both physical and spiritual. All these stories and sentiments are contained within a haibun—a short piece of prose that tells the story and sets the mood—and meaningfully condensed into three lines in the haiku. The form seems simple—a short narrative, then three lines with a five-seven-five syllable pattern—which has lead many readers to regard it as a “children’s form”. It is this simplicity, however, that testifies to the brilliance of Basho. Such strict and simple parameters require precise and purposeful word choice—there is…
Read More

The Sweetest Poetry from the Land of the Free

Whitman in his preface explores America and its Poets. He showcases the USA as the greatest place in the world by showcasing its uniqueness compared to the rest of the world and that included showing how a poet should be. He gives a definition of what a poem is and how far its influence can reach.“A great poem is for ages and ages in common, and for all degrees and complexions, and all departments and sects, and for a woman as much as a man and a man as much as a woman”. In the following paragraph I will explain more on poetry and the uniqueness of the USA. To…
Read More

The Voices of the Voiceless: Comparing the Poetry of Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen

As two key figureheads in what is now deemed the Harlem Renaissance, Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen served as voices for a previously voiceless population. Their poetry speaks of the enduring struggles of being an African American, and the effort required to merely survive in such a discriminatory society. However, despite being poets with similar senses of purpose, their employed methods differed dramatically; Hughes and Cullen approach the field of poetry at two vastly different vantage points. While Hughes and Cullen differ in selections of speaker and audience, their core concepts of struggle, a faulty society, and a wise, complex narrator remain mutual. As blacks in 1920s America, Hughes and…
Read More